EAV Buzz

East Atlanta Forum => Off-Leash => Technology => Topic started by: J. Grouchy on February 19, 2014, 01:33 pm

Title: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: J. Grouchy on February 19, 2014, 01:33 pm
Exploring new cities for Google Fiber (http://googleblog.blogspot.com/2014/02/exploring-new-cities-for-google-fiber.html)

Quote
We've long believed that the Internet’s next chapter will be built on gigabit speeds, so it’s fantastic to see this momentum. And now that we’ve learned a lot from our Google Fiber projects in Kansas City, Austin and Provo, we want to help build more ultra-fast networks. So we’ve invited cities in nine metro areas around the U.S.—34 cities altogether—to work with us to explore what it would take to bring them Google Fiber.

(http://img.gawkerassets.com/img/19g6wtl3asvshpng/ku-xlarge.png)
Title: Google Fiber expansion and Atlanta
Post by: Cap'n Ken on February 19, 2014, 01:35 pm
A friend posted on Facebook that Google is looking at Portland, Oregon as an expansion city, and the linked article said Google has released some more expansion plans.

So ... over to Google Fiber and what do I see?

https://fiber.google.com/newcities/

Why it's Atlanta listed as a "potential" Google Fiber city. It lists a bunch of suburbs nearby, so I'm not quite sure if that means Atlanta plus those places (I'd like to think so), or those places as "Atlanta" (meaning not actually in the city but just in the listed places).

In any case - at least a small yay is in order I suppose. Anybody know anything more about what's been floated or discussed here?
Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: Cap'n Ken on February 19, 2014, 01:42 pm
Great minds think alike. Posts merged.
Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: jsvh on February 19, 2014, 01:58 pm
This makes me so happy!
Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: J. Grouchy on February 19, 2014, 02:04 pm
This makes me so happy!

Well...don't celebrate just yet.  Given the current state of our infrastructure and the level of bureaucracy with all the CoA and metro gov'ts...it's by no means a sure thing.
Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: jsvh on February 19, 2014, 02:16 pm
This makes me so happy!

Well...don't celebrate just yet.  Given the current state of our infrastructure and the level of bureaucracy with all the CoA and metro gov'ts...it's by no means a sure thing.

Oh I agree. They say these cities are just a possibility, but I will be there pushing for it the whole way.
Title: Google Fiber may be coming to Atlanta soon
Post by: mongo on February 19, 2014, 02:19 pm
If you hate Comcast and AT&T like I do, then please write Natalyn Archibong and Mayor Reed expressing your support for Google Fiber and specifically requesting that they take whatever steps are necessary to bring it to the City of Atlanta and our neighborhood.

https://fiber.google.com/newcities/ (https://fiber.google.com/newcities/)
Title: Re: Google Fiber may be coming to Atlanta soon
Post by: vigodas-pants on February 19, 2014, 02:35 pm
If you hate Comcast and AT&T like I do, then please write Natalyn Archibong and Mayor Reed expressing your support for Google Fiber and specifically requesting that they take whatever steps are necessary to bring it to the City of Atlanta and our neighborhood.

https://fiber.google.com/newcities/ (https://fiber.google.com/newcities/)
Wonder if this is the first three-thread merger in buzz history.

http://www.eavbuzz.net/forum/technology/google-fiber-finally-coming-to-atl/?topicseen (http://www.eavbuzz.net/forum/technology/google-fiber-finally-coming-to-atl/?topicseen)
Title: Re: Google Fiber may be coming to Atlanta soon
Post by: mongo on February 19, 2014, 02:38 pm
Whoops, sorry.  I don't usually read the technology thread... In any event, man I hope they bring this to East Atlanta.




If you hate Comcast and AT&T like I do, then please write Natalyn Archibong and Mayor Reed expressing your support for Google Fiber and specifically requesting that they take whatever steps are necessary to bring it to the City of Atlanta and our neighborhood.

https://fiber.google.com/newcities/ (https://fiber.google.com/newcities/)
Wonder if this is the first three-thread merger in buzz history.

http://www.eavbuzz.net/forum/technology/google-fiber-finally-coming-to-atl/?topicseen (http://www.eavbuzz.net/forum/technology/google-fiber-finally-coming-to-atl/?topicseen)
Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: Cap'n Ken on February 19, 2014, 02:44 pm
Three Buzz threads should be enough evidence of demand to get the project going ...

And as little faith as I have in our city's "leaders" to do anything, I'd agree that letters of encouragement to our elected leaders is a good idea.

How much does Comcast pay the city for their franchise?
Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: Mangle on February 19, 2014, 03:22 pm
FINGERS CROSSED!! It would be so nice to have more choices ... considering our shady house can't get satellite and we don't have AT&T Uverse yet.

http://www.myajc.com/news/technology/google-eyes-atlanta-for-super-fast-internet/ndTPS/ (http://www.myajc.com/news/technology/google-eyes-atlanta-for-super-fast-internet/ndTPS/)

The AJC subscriber site has a story up, here are some highlights:

"... In addition to Atlanta, local cities under consideration are Avondale Estates, Brookhaven, College Park, Decatur, East Point, Hapeville, Sandy Springs and Smyrna. Across the county, Google is looking at a mix of major cities such as Phoenix and Portland and smaller communities such as Chapel Hill, NC, and Palo Alto, Calif.

Over the next several months, a team of Google engineers will visit here, seeking to define the complexity of installing a fiber optic network underneath the streets and on utility poles in the various cities."


" ... City officials will have until the beginning of May to provide Google with detailed maps of their infrastructure, as well as proposals for a process to let Google apply for hundreds of construction permits at once. Officials got a heads-up last week, according to a Google spokeswoman.

Google insists it’s not looking for tax breaks or other financial incentives, and that the cities are not in competition with one another."
Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: James on February 19, 2014, 03:25 pm


Quote
" ... City officials will have until the beginning of May to provide Google with detailed maps of their infrastructure, as well as proposals for a process to let Google apply for hundreds of construction permits at once.

So then we're not getting it in CoA.  :([
Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: jsvh on February 19, 2014, 03:35 pm
COA Press Release:
City of Atlanta To Work with Google Fiber To Explore Bringing Residents Ultra-High Speed Internet Access  (http://www.atlantaga.gov//index.aspx?page=672&recordid=2651&utm_source=dlvr.it&utm_medium=twitter)
Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: Jack on February 19, 2014, 03:37 pm
Three Buzz threads should be enough evidence of demand to get the project going ...

And as little faith as I have in our city's "leaders" to do anything, I'd agree that letters of encouragement to our elected leaders is a good idea.

How much does Comcast pay the city for their franchise?

I think Comcast funds City Channel 26 and that's about it.

Quote
" ... City officials will have until the beginning of May to provide Google with detailed maps of their infrastructure, as well as proposals for a process to let Google apply for hundreds of construction permits at once.

So then we're not getting it in CoA.  :([

The message to Councilmember Archibong and Mayor Reed should not only be "we want Google Fiber" but also "we want the permitting department to stop being fucked up NOW."
Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: Andreas on February 19, 2014, 04:12 pm
COA Press Release:
City of Atlanta To Work with Google Fiber To Explore Bringing Residents Ultra-High Speed Internet Access  (http://www.atlantaga.gov//index.aspx?page=672&recordid=2651&utm_source=dlvr.it&utm_medium=twitter)

I love market competition.  I hope Comcast execs are paying attention.
Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: Cap'n Ken on February 19, 2014, 05:37 pm
Three Buzz threads should be enough evidence of demand to get the project going ...

And as little faith as I have in our city's "leaders" to do anything, I'd agree that letters of encouragement to our elected leaders is a good idea.

How much does Comcast pay the city for their franchise?

I think Comcast funds City Channel 26 and that's about it.

They get what I assume is an exclusive franchise to run coax in the city in exchange for putting up a shitty public access channel? I find that hard to believe, even when you account for the graft that is also likely part of the mix.
Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: Jack on February 19, 2014, 06:03 pm
Three Buzz threads should be enough evidence of demand to get the project going ...

And as little faith as I have in our city's "leaders" to do anything, I'd agree that letters of encouragement to our elected leaders is a good idea.

How much does Comcast pay the city for their franchise?

I think Comcast funds City Channel 26 and that's about it.

They get what I assume is an exclusive franchise to run coax in the city in exchange for putting up a shitty public access channel? I find that hard to believe, even when you account for the graft that is also likely part of the mix.

Well, of course I was exaggerating... but not by all that much. Here's the agreement from 1995 (http://www.atlantaga.gov/modules/showdocument.aspx?documentid=447), which says that Comcast has to serve the whole city (not just the profitable parts), that it has to support Channel 26 and some other public access channels (People TV and stuff), that it has to support a "Municipal Communications Network (M-Net)." In terms of dollars, the City apparently got $1.2 million for construction + $1.3 million for operation for M-Net, $1.95 million + $1.4 million for "equipment and facilities for public access" and $0.5 million/year (indexed for inflation) for People TV, $0.15 million of which can be passed through to subscribers.

Basically, Comcast paid about six million dollars, plus about a buck per resident per year (assuming I'm not misreading the document).

In 2009, the agreement was superseded by state law (see O.C.G.A. §36-76-3). I don't know what that agreement says, but it's likely to be even more favorable to Comcast than Atlanta's agreement was.
Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: Folsom on February 19, 2014, 06:21 pm
I signed up for alerts from the fiber site.  Hopefully they gauge interest from customers by signups.  That doesn't mean that CoA won't mess it up regardless. 
Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: Cap'n Ken on February 19, 2014, 07:14 pm
Three Buzz threads should be enough evidence of demand to get the project going ...

And as little faith as I have in our city's "leaders" to do anything, I'd agree that letters of encouragement to our elected leaders is a good idea.

How much does Comcast pay the city for their franchise?

I think Comcast funds City Channel 26 and that's about it.

They get what I assume is an exclusive franchise to run coax in the city in exchange for putting up a shitty public access channel? I find that hard to believe, even when you account for the graft that is also likely part of the mix.

Well, of course I was exaggerating... but not by all that much. Here's the agreement from 1995 (http://www.atlantaga.gov/modules/showdocument.aspx?documentid=447), which says that Comcast has to serve the whole city (not just the profitable parts), that it has to support Channel 26 and some other public access channels (People TV and stuff), that it has to support a "Municipal Communications Network (M-Net)." In terms of dollars, the City apparently got $1.2 million for construction + $1.3 million for operation for M-Net, $1.95 million + $1.4 million for "equipment and facilities for public access" and $0.5 million/year (indexed for inflation) for People TV, $0.15 million of which can be passed through to subscribers.

Basically, Comcast paid about six million dollars, plus about a buck per resident per year (assuming I'm not misreading the document).

In 2009, the agreement was superseded by state law (see O.C.G.A. §36-76-3). I don't know what that agreement says, but it's likely to be even more favorable to Comcast than Atlanta's agreement was.

Thanks, that's helpful. I wonder if Google Fiber qualifies as a "cable" provider that can gain a statewide license.
Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: Cap'n Ken on February 19, 2014, 07:19 pm
COA Press Release:
City of Atlanta To Work with Google Fiber To Explore Bringing Residents Ultra-High Speed Internet Access  (http://www.atlantaga.gov//index.aspx?page=672&recordid=2651&utm_source=dlvr.it&utm_medium=twitter)

So a joint press release - obviously Google has already been in talks with the city. I doubt any further encouragement of elected officials is needed if the mayor is out there touting the possibility (he'll look like a loser if Atlanta isn't picked). I guess we should just keep our eyes open for ways citizens can impact the decision - any maybe make a video about how we would use Gigabit and post it to YouTube.
Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: jsvh on February 19, 2014, 07:41 pm
COA Press Release:
City of Atlanta To Work with Google Fiber To Explore Bringing Residents Ultra-High Speed Internet Access  (http://www.atlantaga.gov//index.aspx?page=672&recordid=2651&utm_source=dlvr.it&utm_medium=twitter)

So a joint press release - obviously Google has already been in talks with the city. I doubt any further encouragement of elected officials is needed if the mayor is out there touting the possibility (he'll look like a loser if Atlanta isn't picked). I guess we should just keep our eyes open for ways citizens can impact the decision - any maybe make a video about how we would use Gigabit and post it to YouTube.

I also signed up for alerts on the site. Since it asks for addresses I assume they are considering interest in each city / neighborhood.
Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: Cap'n Ken on February 19, 2014, 07:49 pm
COA Press Release:
City of Atlanta To Work with Google Fiber To Explore Bringing Residents Ultra-High Speed Internet Access  (http://www.atlantaga.gov//index.aspx?page=672&recordid=2651&utm_source=dlvr.it&utm_medium=twitter)

So a joint press release - obviously Google has already been in talks with the city. I doubt any further encouragement of elected officials is needed if the mayor is out there touting the possibility (he'll look like a loser if Atlanta isn't picked). I guess we should just keep our eyes open for ways citizens can impact the decision - any maybe make a video about how we would use Gigabit and post it to YouTube.

I also signed up for alerts on the site. Since it asks for addresses I assume they are considering interest in each city / neighborhood.

Yeah, I did that back when they first solicited requests (you're welcome). I got kicked back an email today asking me to spread the word, I guess to drum up even more support.
Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: Cap'n Ken on February 20, 2014, 09:13 am
Saw on The Facebooks that somebody spotted a Google Fiber truck towing an empty wire spool in Grant Park this morning.
Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: Mr. Man on February 20, 2014, 09:43 am
What exactly is google fiber and why are we so excited?
Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: Gmoney on February 20, 2014, 09:51 am
What exactly is google fiber and why are we so excited?
Insanely fast internet (20 times faster than the 50 megabit currently offered by Comcast) provided by a company that is almost certainly going to be a lot easier to work with, and at a price competitive with most current ISPs.
Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: Cap'n Ken on February 20, 2014, 09:56 am
What exactly is google fiber and why are we so excited?
Insanely fast internet (20 times faster than the 50 megabit currently offered by Comcast) provided by a company that is almost certainly going to be a lot easier to work with, and at a price competitive with most current ISPs.

Right - like 20 times as fast as "really good" speeds we get now at basically the same price (about $70 per month).
Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: J. Grouchy on February 20, 2014, 10:35 am
I signed up for alerts from the fiber site.  Hopefully they gauge interest from customers by signups.  That doesn't mean that CoA won't mess it up regardless.

Yeah...me too.

https://fiber.google.com/newcities/
Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: Jack on February 20, 2014, 11:05 am
What exactly is google fiber and why are we so excited?
Insanely fast internet (20 times faster than the 50 megabit currently offered by Comcast) provided by a company that is almost certainly going to be a lot easier to work with, and at a price competitive with most current ISPs.

Or somewhat-fast internet (5 megabits) for $0/month (after a one-time installation fee).
Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: James on February 20, 2014, 11:21 am
COA Press Release:
City of Atlanta To Work with Google Fiber To Explore Bringing Residents Ultra-High Speed Internet Access  (http://www.atlantaga.gov//index.aspx?page=672&recordid=2651&utm_source=dlvr.it&utm_medium=twitter)

I hope they pull it off, but I feel for any poor non-google schmuck trying to get a permit at the same time.
Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: Cap'n Ken on February 20, 2014, 01:30 pm
COA Press Release:
City of Atlanta To Work with Google Fiber To Explore Bringing Residents Ultra-High Speed Internet Access  (http://www.atlantaga.gov//index.aspx?page=672&recordid=2651&utm_source=dlvr.it&utm_medium=twitter)

I hope they pull it off, but I feel for any poor non-google schmuck trying to get a permit at the same time.

Or anytime, really, unless a high-ranking city official is behind your cause.
Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: JBB on February 20, 2014, 08:46 pm
Three Buzz threads should be enough evidence of demand to get the project going ...

And as little faith as I have in our city's "leaders" to do anything, I'd agree that letters of encouragement to our elected leaders is a good idea.

How much does Comcast pay the city for their franchise?

I think Comcast funds City Channel 26 and that's about it.

They get what I assume is an exclusive franchise to run coax in the city in exchange for putting up a shitty public access channel? I find that hard to believe, even when you account for the graft that is also likely part of the mix.

Well, of course I was exaggerating... but not by all that much. Here's the agreement from 1995 (http://www.atlantaga.gov/modules/showdocument.aspx?documentid=447), which says that Comcast has to serve the whole city (not just the profitable parts), that it has to support Channel 26 and some other public access channels (People TV and stuff), that it has to support a "Municipal Communications Network (M-Net)." In terms of dollars, the City apparently got $1.2 million for construction + $1.3 million for operation for M-Net, $1.95 million + $1.4 million for "equipment and facilities for public access" and $0.5 million/year (indexed for inflation) for People TV, $0.15 million of which can be passed through to subscribers.

Basically, Comcast paid about six million dollars, plus about a buck per resident per year (assuming I'm not misreading the document).

In 2009, the agreement was superseded by state law (see O.C.G.A. §36-76-3). I don't know what that agreement says, but it's likely to be even more favorable to Comcast than Atlanta's agreement was.
if you haven't watched channel 26 lately, you can see the results of a complete overhaul of their studio and broadcast equipment over the last couple months.  Also, the city lawyer who oversees the Comcast contract happens to be the first apprentice Donald Trump fired. Some trivia for you.
Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: jsvh on February 21, 2014, 08:52 am
And the competition has begun: Saw that Comcast has announced they are going to bring their 505 Mbps service to Atlanta for only... wait for it... $400 a month.

That's right folks, you can get half the speed of Fiber for only 5 times the cost and you don't have to give up the pleasure of dealing with Comcast!

http://www.comcast.com/505 (http://www.comcast.com/505)
Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: Cap'n Ken on February 21, 2014, 09:09 am
And the competition has begun: Saw that Comcast has announced they are going to bring their 505 Mbps service to Atlanta for only... wait for it... $400 a month.

That's right folks, you can get half the speed of Fiber for only 5 times the cost and you don't have to give up the pleasure of dealing with Comcast!

http://www.comcast.com/505 (http://www.comcast.com/505)

BTW, I saw that Uverse is now offering 45Mbps (their previous max was 24) and I'm set to get hooked up with that next week. I'll report back actual results. Also, the online order flow for that upgrade shows you a $99 installation fee (a tech does have to come out), but the kind lady on the chat line tells me that's an "error" and there is no fee. No, it's not that when you ask them about the fee they waive it ... no really ... it's just an error in the online system.
Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: J. Grouchy on February 21, 2014, 09:12 am
And the competition has begun: Saw that Comcast has announced they are going to bring their 505 Mbps service to Atlanta for only... wait for it... $400 a month.

That's right folks, you can get half the speed of Fiber for only 5 times the cost and you don't have to give up the pleasure of dealing with Comcast!

http://www.comcast.com/505 (http://www.comcast.com/505)

BTW, I saw that Uverse is now offering 45Mbps (their previous max was 24) and I'm set to get hooked up with that next week. I'll report back actual results. Also, the online order flow for that upgrade shows you a $99 installation fee (a tech does have to come out), but the kind lady on the chat line tells me that's an "error" and there is no fee. No, it's not that when you ask them about the fee they waive it ... no really ... it's just an error in the online system.

Yeah.  They play their little games.  If you sign up for Comcast online, the only option is for a 24 month contract period.  If you call them, they say no contract is necessary.

...which reminds me...I may need to see what sort of offer they can give me. 
Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: Cap'n Ken on February 21, 2014, 09:16 am
And the competition has begun: Saw that Comcast has announced they are going to bring their 505 Mbps service to Atlanta for only... wait for it... $400 a month.

That's right folks, you can get half the speed of Fiber for only 5 times the cost and you don't have to give up the pleasure of dealing with Comcast!

http://www.comcast.com/505 (http://www.comcast.com/505)

BTW, I saw that Uverse is now offering 45Mbps (their previous max was 24) and I'm set to get hooked up with that next week. I'll report back actual results. Also, the online order flow for that upgrade shows you a $99 installation fee (a tech does have to come out), but the kind lady on the chat line tells me that's an "error" and there is no fee. No, it's not that when you ask them about the fee they waive it ... no really ... it's just an error in the online system.

Yeah.  They play their little games.  If you sign up for Comcast online, the only option is for a 24 month contract period.  If you call them, they say no contract is necessary.

...which reminds me...I may need to see what sort of offer they can give me.

I kind of view those games like buying a car. The fact that there are people who will walk on the lot and pay sticker price means the dealer is more willing to work a deal with somebody who isn't willing to over-pay. It's a nice little subsidy.
Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: angryuser on February 21, 2014, 09:29 am
And the competition has begun: Saw that Comcast has announced they are going to bring their 505 Mbps service to Atlanta for only... wait for it... $400 a month.

That's right folks, you can get half the speed of Fiber for only 5 times the cost and you don't have to give up the pleasure of dealing with Comcast!

http://www.comcast.com/505 (http://www.comcast.com/505)

BTW, I saw that Uverse is now offering 45Mbps (their previous max was 24) and I'm set to get hooked up with that next week. I'll report back actual results. Also, the online order flow for that upgrade shows you a $99 installation fee (a tech does have to come out), but the kind lady on the chat line tells me that's an "error" and there is no fee. No, it's not that when you ask them about the fee they waive it ... no really ... it's just an error in the online system.

Yeah.  They play their little games.  If you sign up for Comcast online, the only option is for a 24 month contract period.  If you call them, they say no contract is necessary.

...which reminds me...I may need to see what sort of offer they can give me.

Yep. I now know U-Verse is finally an option here. Time to call and get comcast to knock some money off this outrageously high bill.
Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: lore on February 21, 2014, 10:58 am
And the competition has begun: Saw that Comcast has announced they are going to bring their 505 Mbps service to Atlanta for only... wait for it... $400 a month.

That's right folks, you can get half the speed of Fiber for only 5 times the cost and you don't have to give up the pleasure of dealing with Comcast!

http://www.comcast.com/505 (http://www.comcast.com/505)

BTW, I saw that Uverse is now offering 45Mbps (their previous max was 24) and I'm set to get hooked up with that next week. I'll report back actual results. Also, the online order flow for that upgrade shows you a $99 installation fee (a tech does have to come out), but the kind lady on the chat line tells me that's an "error" and there is no fee. No, it's not that when you ask them about the fee they waive it ... no really ... it's just an error in the online system.

Yeah.  They play their little games.  If you sign up for Comcast online, the only option is for a 24 month contract period.  If you call them, they say no contract is necessary.

...which reminds me...I may need to see what sort of offer they can give me.

Yep. I now know U-Verse is finally an option here. Time to call and get comcast to knock some money off this outrageously high bill.

Well, supposedly U-Verse charged our tenants 200$ for install. And it's still slow as shit.
Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: Cap'n Ken on February 21, 2014, 11:13 am
And the competition has begun: Saw that Comcast has announced they are going to bring their 505 Mbps service to Atlanta for only... wait for it... $400 a month.

That's right folks, you can get half the speed of Fiber for only 5 times the cost and you don't have to give up the pleasure of dealing with Comcast!

http://www.comcast.com/505 (http://www.comcast.com/505)

BTW, I saw that Uverse is now offering 45Mbps (their previous max was 24) and I'm set to get hooked up with that next week. I'll report back actual results. Also, the online order flow for that upgrade shows you a $99 installation fee (a tech does have to come out), but the kind lady on the chat line tells me that's an "error" and there is no fee. No, it's not that when you ask them about the fee they waive it ... no really ... it's just an error in the online system.

Yeah.  They play their little games.  If you sign up for Comcast online, the only option is for a 24 month contract period.  If you call them, they say no contract is necessary.

...which reminds me...I may need to see what sort of offer they can give me.

Yep. I now know U-Verse is finally an option here. Time to call and get comcast to knock some money off this outrageously high bill.

Well, supposedly U-Verse charged our tenants 200$ for install. And it's still slow as shit.

I don't know what kind of deals they might have out there now, but AT&T paid me $350 to take U-Verse back in the initial rollout. Dropping in to an AT&T store seemed to help loosen their wallet.

They've also been good about coming out and addressing slowness issues that have come up here. Speed over their system is real dependent on the quality of wiring, switch box connections and the like.

But it still can't hit Comcast speeds. I'll be interested to see how the 45 Mbps system performs. My interests continue to lie in avoiding Comcast, but that gets harder as speeds diverge.
Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: angryuser on February 21, 2014, 11:30 am
And the competition has begun: Saw that Comcast has announced they are going to bring their 505 Mbps service to Atlanta for only... wait for it... $400 a month.

That's right folks, you can get half the speed of Fiber for only 5 times the cost and you don't have to give up the pleasure of dealing with Comcast!

http://www.comcast.com/505 (http://www.comcast.com/505)

BTW, I saw that Uverse is now offering 45Mbps (their previous max was 24) and I'm set to get hooked up with that next week. I'll report back actual results. Also, the online order flow for that upgrade shows you a $99 installation fee (a tech does have to come out), but the kind lady on the chat line tells me that's an "error" and there is no fee. No, it's not that when you ask them about the fee they waive it ... no really ... it's just an error in the online system.

Yeah.  They play their little games.  If you sign up for Comcast online, the only option is for a 24 month contract period.  If you call them, they say no contract is necessary.

...which reminds me...I may need to see what sort of offer they can give me.

Yep. I now know U-Verse is finally an option here. Time to call and get comcast to knock some money off this outrageously high bill.

Well, supposedly U-Verse charged our tenants 200$ for install. And it's still slow as shit.

I have no intentions of using them as anything other than a bargaining chip in gaining pricing concessions from Comcast.
Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: Folsom on February 21, 2014, 12:37 pm
Comcast is supposedly doubling the 50M Blast speed to 100M in March.  I believe only for double and triple play bundles first.

I had the Uverse 24M, but I switched over to Comcast when they doubled the Blast from 25M to 50M.  Also, for the Uverse 45M, you are required to rent a modem even if you only get internet.  If you also get TV, then it's no different since you must rent anyway.
Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: rawr on February 21, 2014, 03:36 pm
I have no intentions of using them as anything other than a bargaining chip in gaining pricing concessions from Comcast.

We do that about every 6 months.  We were averaging around $220 (HBO, SHO, high speed, etc) and are now paying closer to $130 locked for a year.  The AT&T bit definitely helped, but also I think so much depends on who you talk to as I am sure you know quite well.
Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: loopy on February 21, 2014, 09:16 pm
Spotted at Cherokee and georgia ave.
(http://i.imgur.com/LkskDHK.jpg)
Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: dsnation on February 21, 2014, 10:30 pm
Not sure about the other cities, but Google has a sales and engineering office in midtown and a data center in Austell.  I'm hoping that gives us some advantage in getting fiber here.  Totally wouldn't surprise me if Decatur got it though since they've already got municipal wifi and generally seem to have their shit together with permitting, etc.  Smaller footprint too. 
Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: J. Grouchy on February 22, 2014, 09:00 am
Not sure about the other cities, but Google has a sales and engineering office in midtown and a data center in Austell.  I'm hoping that gives us some advantage in getting fiber here.  Totally wouldn't surprise me if Decatur got it though since they've already got municipal wifi and generally seem to have their shit together with permitting, etc.  Smaller footprint too.

I gather they are looking at the metro area all-in or all-out, not individual towns.
Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: Cap'n Ken on February 22, 2014, 10:48 am
Not sure about the other cities, but Google has a sales and engineering office in midtown and a data center in Austell.  I'm hoping that gives us some advantage in getting fiber here.  Totally wouldn't surprise me if Decatur got it though since they've already got municipal wifi and generally seem to have their shit together with permitting, etc.  Smaller footprint too.

I gather they are looking at the metro area all-in or all-out, not individual towns.

Probably not a "Smyrna or bust" approach, but I also think they want a broad footprint if they're going to open in a market.
Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: micki mouse on February 22, 2014, 11:23 am
Well, if they are in Grant Park, how long before EA can get some?
Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: Cap'n Ken on February 22, 2014, 11:27 am
Well, if they are in Grant Park, how long before EA can get some?

While exciting to see, I don't think the Google Fiber trucks running around Grant Park are laying fiber just yet.
Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: JBB on February 22, 2014, 01:12 pm
Well, if they are in Grant Park, how long before EA can get some?

While exciting to see, I don't think the Google Fiber trucks running around Grant Park are laying fiber just yet.
could they be running diagnostic tests on fiber trunks previously laid?  There is a trunk running along the SE Beltline, among other places.
Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: Cap'n Ken on February 22, 2014, 01:23 pm
Well, if they are in Grant Park, how long before EA can get some?

While exciting to see, I don't think the Google Fiber trucks running around Grant Park are laying fiber just yet.
could they be running diagnostic tests on fiber trunks previously laid?  There is a trunk running along the SE Beltline, among other places.

Yeah, I would suspect this is a technical evaluation of some sort. A very positive sign (I think Google knows putting branded Google Fiber trucks out in the field is going to create expectations), but I wouldn't expect a Google Fiber salesman to be knocking on doors anytime soon*


*please don't shoot the Google Fiber salesman.
Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: Nate (NFN) on February 27, 2014, 08:29 am
http://brookhavenpost.co/mattison-brookhaven-has-been-selected-to-receive-google-fiber/14034 (http://brookhavenpost.co/mattison-brookhaven-has-been-selected-to-receive-google-fiber/14034)

Interesting update...
Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: J. Grouchy on February 27, 2014, 09:41 am
http://brookhavenpost.co/mattison-brookhaven-has-been-selected-to-receive-google-fiber/14034 (http://brookhavenpost.co/mattison-brookhaven-has-been-selected-to-receive-google-fiber/14034)

Interesting update...


“While Google has asked for confidentiality regarding the details of their Google Fiber launch in Brookhaven & Metro Atlanta, I can confirm that all of the cities listed on their webpage (https://fiber.google.com/newcities/ (https://fiber.google.com/newcities/)), including Brookhaven, below HAVE BEEN SELECTED to receive Google Fiber."

sooo...either dude's full of shit or he's the worst person to trust with anything confidential.
Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: Nate (NFN) on February 27, 2014, 09:47 am
http://brookhavenpost.co/mattison-brookhaven-has-been-selected-to-receive-google-fiber/14034 (http://brookhavenpost.co/mattison-brookhaven-has-been-selected-to-receive-google-fiber/14034)

Interesting update...


“While Google has asked for confidentiality regarding the details of their Google Fiber launch in Brookhaven & Metro Atlanta, I can confirm that all of the cities listed on their webpage (https://fiber.google.com/newcities/ (https://fiber.google.com/newcities/)), including Brookhaven, below HAVE BEEN SELECTED to receive Google Fiber."

sooo...either dude's full of shit or he's the worst person to trust with anything confidential.

Yeah, not telling him my secrets. I was going to post the same thing, but I was on my phone. I am hoping he was given permission to say the city was awarded it but not saying "details" such as date of release and what not.

Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: Cap'n Ken on February 27, 2014, 10:43 am
http://brookhavenpost.co/mattison-brookhaven-has-been-selected-to-receive-google-fiber/14034 (http://brookhavenpost.co/mattison-brookhaven-has-been-selected-to-receive-google-fiber/14034)

Interesting update...


“While Google has asked for confidentiality regarding the details of their Google Fiber launch in Brookhaven & Metro Atlanta, I can confirm that all of the cities listed on their webpage (https://fiber.google.com/newcities/ (https://fiber.google.com/newcities/)), including Brookhaven, below HAVE BEEN SELECTED to receive Google Fiber."

sooo...either dude's full of shit or he's the worst person to trust with anything confidential.

Yeah, not telling him my secrets. I was going to post the same thing, but I was on my phone. I am hoping he was given permission to say the city was awarded it but not saying "details" such as date of release and what not.

Yeah, thanks a lot for breaking confidentiality on a pretty important thing, Councilman Douchebag.

I have to say, there's nothing but positive indications (the mayor's statement, mayor and staff out at Google talking about it, trucks seen, idiot suburban officials yapping) that we're likely to actually get this.
Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: Fondude on February 27, 2014, 12:08 pm
More on "Councilman Douchebag."

BATES MATTISON for CITY COUNCIL of BROOKHAVEN - District 3 (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I9LW4WpT8g8#ws)
Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: Cap'n Ken on March 11, 2014, 10:15 am
Saw a story this morning about Fiber expanding in Kansas City:

http://thenextweb.com/google/2014/03/11/google-fiber-offered-158-new-fiberhoods-kansas-city-grandview-raytown-gladstone/?utm_source=social&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=profeed (http://thenextweb.com/google/2014/03/11/google-fiber-offered-158-new-fiberhoods-kansas-city-grandview-raytown-gladstone/?utm_source=social&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=profeed)

Note the reference to how Google prioritizes build-outs using this "fiberhood" concept that gives higher priority to areas where a lot of people have expressed an interest in Fiber.

So if you haven't already, please go to https://fiber.google.com (https://fiber.google.com)  and use the "check address" feature and sign up for their updates if you'd like to let them know you're yet another person around here who would like their service.
Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: T@Nk on March 11, 2014, 10:58 am
More on "Councilman Douchebag."

BATES MATTISON for CITY COUNCIL of BROOKHAVEN - District 3 (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I9LW4WpT8g8#ws)

(http://5plitreel.files.wordpress.com/2011/06/delmar.jpg)

Care for some gopher?
Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: Jack on March 11, 2014, 12:56 pm
Saw a story this morning about Fiber expanding in Kansas City:

http://thenextweb.com/google/2014/03/11/google-fiber-offered-158-new-fiberhoods-kansas-city-grandview-raytown-gladstone/?utm_source=social&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=profeed (http://thenextweb.com/google/2014/03/11/google-fiber-offered-158-new-fiberhoods-kansas-city-grandview-raytown-gladstone/?utm_source=social&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=profeed)

Note the reference to how Google prioritizes build-outs using this "fiberhood" concept that gives higher priority to areas where a lot of people have expressed an interest in Fiber.

So if you haven't already, please go to https://fiber.google.com (https://fiber.google.com)  and use the "check address" feature and sign up for their updates if you'd like to let them know you're yet another person around here who would like their service.

Quote from: Article
There’s also a deadline for each area, so residents will need to rally some support from their community to qualify for the planned roll-out.

Our neighborhood has quite a few people who would benefit from the free 5Mbps access -- probably more people than would pick the $70/month 1Gbps access -- but I would expect them to be much less aware of the possibility and therefore less likely to sign up.

I think we should organize a concerted effort to reach out to the free 5Mbps crowd, both to get them to sign up and to create a fund to subsidize their $300(?) initial installation cost -- sort of a "neighbor in need [of Internet]" thing.

What say y'all?
Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: jsvh on March 11, 2014, 01:57 pm
Saw a story this morning about Fiber expanding in Kansas City:

http://thenextweb.com/google/2014/03/11/google-fiber-offered-158-new-fiberhoods-kansas-city-grandview-raytown-gladstone/?utm_source=social&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=profeed (http://thenextweb.com/google/2014/03/11/google-fiber-offered-158-new-fiberhoods-kansas-city-grandview-raytown-gladstone/?utm_source=social&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=profeed)

Note the reference to how Google prioritizes build-outs using this "fiberhood" concept that gives higher priority to areas where a lot of people have expressed an interest in Fiber.

So if you haven't already, please go to https://fiber.google.com (https://fiber.google.com)  and use the "check address" feature and sign up for their updates if you'd like to let them know you're yet another person around here who would like their service.

Quote from: Article
There’s also a deadline for each area, so residents will need to rally some support from their community to qualify for the planned roll-out.

Our neighborhood has quite a few people who would benefit from the free 5Mbps access -- probably more people than would pick the $70/month 1Gbps access -- but I would expect them to be much less aware of the possibility and therefore less likely to sign up.

I think we should organize a concerted effort to reach out to the free 5Mbps crowd, both to get them to sign up and to create a fund to subsidize their $300(?) initial installation cost -- sort of a "neighbor in need [of Internet]" thing.

What say y'all?

I think a focused recruitment drive will makes sense once they get to the "fiberhood" stage. They offer to do the $300 as $25 for 12 months, which should be affordable enough to most that would even consider it. I think paying for others could get complicated too. So I would focus on the "marketing" / getting the word out first rather than raising money to pay for people. That said, I might directly offer to help a couple neighbors if I think it will make a difference.
Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: Jack on March 11, 2014, 02:18 pm
I think a focused recruitment drive will makes sense once they get to the "fiberhood" stage. They offer to do the $300 as $25 for 12 months, which should be affordable enough to most that would even consider it. I think paying for others could get complicated too. So I would focus on the "marketing" / getting the word out first rather than raising money to pay for people. That said, I might directly offer to help a couple neighbors if I think it will make a difference.

At least part of my motivation for the idea is to make it more likely that EAV gets to the "fiberhood" stage to begin with. Not to sound insensitive, but helping people afford it is kind of secondary.

I was thinking of a pitch that would go something like "hey, if you sign up for emails about Google Fiber so that EAV has a better chance of qualifying as a 'fiberhood', we'll also put you on this list of people for whom we might consider subsidizing the installation cost. There's no commitment to buy service (or guarantee of getting a subsidy)."

I think there are at least some people who wouldn't care enough to bother registering their interest with Google without the added incentive (unless they were misled to think the installation was free too).

Also, I'm not talking about the $25/month Internet service crowd -- although we should of course encourage them to sign up as well. I'm talking about the $0/month use-the-computers-at-the-library crowd. (Who knows, maybe we'd see about furnishing them with a computer to use the service with, or more likely partnering with one of the charities that already does that sort of thing.)
Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: jsvh on March 11, 2014, 03:04 pm
At least part of my motivation for the idea is to make it more likely that EAV gets to the "fiberhood" stage to begin with. Not to sound insensitive, but helping people afford it is kind of secondary.


Assuming they do the roll out like they did in Kansas City, if Atlanta gets accepted as a Fiber city then they will start asking for sign-ups across the entire city (proper) and the neighborhoods with the most signups will get connected first.

Here is an on going sign-up "competition" between neighborhoods in the in the recently announced suburb of "South Kansas City, MO": https://fiber.google.com/cities/kansascity/#zone=South+Kansas+City,+MO&fiberhood=

But I think we the same page on trying to get support in the area.
Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: Nugget1977 on March 27, 2014, 02:45 pm
I just got this email from the fine folks at google fiber:

"Thanks for your interest in Google Fiber!

We’re excited to start discussions with Atlanta, Avondale Estates, Brookhaven, College Park, Decatur, East Point, Hapeville, Sandy Springs, and Smyrna to bring Google Fiber to your area — and we’re glad you are, too.

We know you probably have friends and neighbors who want to know more about Google Fiber as well, so here’s something you can do today:"

Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: T@Nk on March 27, 2014, 03:09 pm
A table at Glenwood and Flatshoals.

(http://images2.wikia.nocookie.net/__cb20130927194653/lesmiserables/images/d/db/You-shall-not-pass1.jpg)

...unless you sign.  8)
Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: J. Grouchy on April 21, 2014, 04:37 pm
AT&T Is Considering Rolling Out Gigabit Fiber To a Ton of Cities (http://gizmodo.com/at-t-is-considering-rolling-out-gigabit-fiber-to-a-ton-1565712462)

(http://i.kinja-img.com/gawker-media/image/upload/ns5cavwvxl70cozvs7ti.jpg)
Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: Cap'n Ken on April 21, 2014, 04:39 pm
In other words - when Google Fiber comes to one of their markets, they'll roll out higher speeds there. That's what's happening in Austin right now.
Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: jsvh on May 01, 2014, 06:49 pm
Atlanta, others make Google Internet deadline | [url=http://www.ajc.com]www.ajc.com (http://www.ajc.com/news/business/atlanta-others-make-google-internet-deadline/nfmxS/?ecmp=ajc_social_twitter_2014_sfp)[/url]

Good job ATL!! Bring on the Fiber!!
Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: WhitNerd on May 01, 2014, 08:00 pm
Please, for the love of God let their be more options  |~  Comcast is the absolute worst, our internet has been in and out for 2 years. They do keep crediting our account, but I would rather have fast, reliable internet service.
Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: angryuser on May 01, 2014, 08:36 pm
Please, for the love of God let their be more options  |~  Comcast is the absolute worst, our internet has been in and out for 2 years. They do keep crediting our account, but I would rather have fast, reliable internet service.

Google'd be the only reason there is/will be any.

Standard current company response to why they haven't built out for more speed:

"buh buh buh, we can't..."
no, you assholes, your monopoly just has allowed you not to.


In addition to Comcast trying to buy Time Warner, AT&T is looking to buy DirecTV.
http://www.ajc.com/weblogs/biz-beat/2014/may/01/report-t-wants-acquire-directv/ (http://www.ajc.com/weblogs/biz-beat/2014/may/01/report-t-wants-acquire-directv/)

(http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-IQqeT7AKo_g/UhrajJcIbcI/AAAAAAAAHU4/HzuRsqBPQbk/s1600/unamused.gif)


This is a sadly amusing look at where we're gonna end up if ComastT&T have their way:
http://www.theverge.com/2014/4/30/5666628/your-corporate-internet-nightmare-starts-now (http://www.theverge.com/2014/4/30/5666628/your-corporate-internet-nightmare-starts-now)
Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: vigodas-pants on May 01, 2014, 09:14 pm
Hopefully U-Verse expands coverage here. We've been very happy with them.
Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: jsvh on May 01, 2014, 09:58 pm
(http://www.neontommy.com/sites/default/files/comcast-time-warner-cable-company-south-park-meme.jpg?1393369148)

This South Park episode is so relevant.
Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: angryuser on May 13, 2014, 08:03 am
This is good. Really good.

Net Neutrality in the US: Now What?
Net Neutrality in the US: Now What? (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NAxMyTwmu_M#ws)
Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: lore on May 13, 2014, 01:20 pm
Hopefully U-Verse expands coverage here. We've been very happy with them.
Uverse is currently throttling anything I try and stream via ROKU, despite the fact that I also pay for tv service.
Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: vigodas-pants on May 13, 2014, 01:26 pm
Hopefully U-Verse expands coverage here. We've been very happy with them.
Uverse is currently throttling anything I try and stream via ROKU, despite the fact that I also pay for tv service.

How are you able to confirm that? Just general slowness?
Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: katherine77 on October 14, 2014, 09:32 am
AT&T bringing "super fast Internet" to Atlanta

http://www.ajc.com/news/business/att-picks-atlanta-and-three-other-cities-for-super/nhh4s/?ecmp=ajc_social_twitter_2014_sfp (http://www.ajc.com/news/business/att-picks-atlanta-and-three-other-cities-for-super/nhh4s/?ecmp=ajc_social_twitter_2014_sfp)
Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: Cap'n Ken on October 14, 2014, 09:36 am
AT&T bringing "super fast Internet" to Atlanta

http://www.ajc.com/news/business/att-picks-atlanta-and-three-other-cities-for-super/nhh4s/?ecmp=ajc_social_twitter_2014_sfp (http://www.ajc.com/news/business/att-picks-atlanta-and-three-other-cities-for-super/nhh4s/?ecmp=ajc_social_twitter_2014_sfp)

That's great news - I'm guessing it means AT&T knows Google is about to announce Atlanta as one of its new Fiber markets.
Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: Shamamama on October 14, 2014, 11:15 am
AT&T bringing "super fast Internet" to Atlanta

http://www.ajc.com/news/business/att-picks-atlanta-and-three-other-cities-for-super/nhh4s/?ecmp=ajc_social_twitter_2014_sfp (http://www.ajc.com/news/business/att-picks-atlanta-and-three-other-cities-for-super/nhh4s/?ecmp=ajc_social_twitter_2014_sfp)

That's great news - I'm guessing it means AT&T knows Google is about to announce Atlanta as one of its new Fiber markets.
So maybe I should hold off on the ol switch to Xfinity?
Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: Cap'n Ken on October 14, 2014, 12:16 pm
AT&T bringing "super fast Internet" to Atlanta

http://www.ajc.com/news/business/att-picks-atlanta-and-three-other-cities-for-super/nhh4s/?ecmp=ajc_social_twitter_2014_sfp (http://www.ajc.com/news/business/att-picks-atlanta-and-three-other-cities-for-super/nhh4s/?ecmp=ajc_social_twitter_2014_sfp)

That's great news - I'm guessing it means AT&T knows Google is about to announce Atlanta as one of its new Fiber markets.
So maybe I should hold off on the ol switch to Xfinity?

Just don't get yourself into a contract.
Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: J. Grouchy on October 14, 2014, 02:04 pm
AT&T bringing "super fast Internet" to Atlanta

http://www.ajc.com/news/business/att-picks-atlanta-and-three-other-cities-for-super/nhh4s/?ecmp=ajc_social_twitter_2014_sfp (http://www.ajc.com/news/business/att-picks-atlanta-and-three-other-cities-for-super/nhh4s/?ecmp=ajc_social_twitter_2014_sfp)

That's great news - I'm guessing it means AT&T knows Google is about to announce Atlanta as one of its new Fiber markets.

That reminds me...
The other day on the highway I passed a contractor truck that had "Google Fiber" stenciled on the back.  It didn't look like a scam job or anything.
Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: Folsom on October 15, 2014, 08:30 am
I think the first people getting the fast AT&T service are the ones on the old IFITL service.  Good for them though, they've been stuck on the old Bellsouth service for a long time.
Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: Cap'n Ken on October 15, 2014, 08:41 am
I think the first people getting the fast AT&T service are the ones on the old IFITL service.  Good for them though, they've been stuck on the old Bellsouth service for a long time.

Not sure what IFITL is, but the article says this will be a U-Verse service. So if you get U-Verse you'd have access to their gigabit.
Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: Fawkes on October 15, 2014, 08:54 am
I think the first people getting the fast AT&T service are the ones on the old IFITL service.  Good for them though, they've been stuck on the old Bellsouth service for a long time.

Not sure what IFITL is, but the article says this will be a U-Verse service. So if you get U-Verse you'd have access to their gigabit.

I'm on U-Verse, so here's hoping.
Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: vigodas-pants on October 15, 2014, 09:26 am
I think the first people getting the fast AT&T service are the ones on the old IFITL service.  Good for them though, they've been stuck on the old Bellsouth service for a long time.

Not sure what IFITL is, but the article says this will be a U-Verse service. So if you get U-Verse you'd have access to their gigabit.

It will be great to have it available, but it's going to be very pricey.
Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: Cap'n Ken on October 15, 2014, 09:35 am
I think the first people getting the fast AT&T service are the ones on the old IFITL service.  Good for them though, they've been stuck on the old Bellsouth service for a long time.

Not sure what IFITL is, but the article says this will be a U-Verse service. So if you get U-Verse you'd have access to their gigabit.

It will be great to have it available, but it's going to be very pricey.


... until Google Fiber launches.
Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: Cap'n Ken on October 15, 2014, 09:39 am
Looks like AT&T in Austin is offering Gigabit (up to, of course) for $99 a month.

http://www.marketwatch.com/story/u-verse-with-att-gigapowersm-gets-a-super-fast-speed-lift-2014-08-11 (http://www.marketwatch.com/story/u-verse-with-att-gigapowersm-gets-a-super-fast-speed-lift-2014-08-11)
Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: vigodas-pants on October 15, 2014, 10:18 am
Looks like AT&T in Austin is offering Gigabit (up to, of course) for $99 a month.

http://www.marketwatch.com/story/u-verse-with-att-gigapowersm-gets-a-super-fast-speed-lift-2014-08-11 (http://www.marketwatch.com/story/u-verse-with-att-gigapowersm-gets-a-super-fast-speed-lift-2014-08-11)

Yeah, I saw that after I posted.  Should have looked up the cost prior to- was just thinking that with as much as they charge for their current tiers, 1GB would be insanely expensive.  Looks like the best thing about Google's play and their $70/1GB price point is that it will drastically drive down the cost of lesser offerings. 

It also looks like AT&T is offering
Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: Folsom on October 15, 2014, 12:49 pm
I think the first people getting the fast AT&T service are the ones on the old IFITL service.  Good for them though, they've been stuck on the old Bellsouth service for a long time.

Not sure what IFITL is, but the article says this will be a U-Verse service. So if you get U-Verse you'd have access to their gigabit.

The IFITL service was Ethernet to your house, so it's easy for AT&T to upgrade those customers.  For everyone else on U-Verse, they'll have to run new wires or fiber.
Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: Cap'n Ken on October 15, 2014, 01:12 pm
I think the first people getting the fast AT&T service are the ones on the old IFITL service.  Good for them though, they've been stuck on the old Bellsouth service for a long time.

Not sure what IFITL is, but the article says this will be a U-Verse service. So if you get U-Verse you'd have access to their gigabit.

The IFITL service was Ethernet to your house, so it's easy for AT&T to upgrade those customers.  For everyone else on U-Verse, they'll have to run new wires or fiber.

Or just run 40 lines to your house! That's actually how they got me on the "up to 50 mbps" service. Their lines max at 25, so they just ran another and they have a router that manages the flow.
Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: Folsom on October 15, 2014, 01:20 pm
Do you pay for the modem rental for the 50Mbs service?  When I had the 25Mbs service, I bought a cheap modem off ebay so I could avoid the rental fee.
Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: Cap'n Ken on October 15, 2014, 03:44 pm
Do you pay for the modem rental for the 50Mbs service?  When I had the 25Mbs service, I bought a cheap modem off ebay so I could avoid the rental fee.

Yeah, they hit me with a $4 monthly fee for that.
Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: Shamamama on October 15, 2014, 03:50 pm
AT&T bringing "super fast Internet" to Atlanta

http://www.ajc.com/news/business/att-picks-atlanta-and-three-other-cities-for-super/nhh4s/?ecmp=ajc_social_twitter_2014_sfp (http://www.ajc.com/news/business/att-picks-atlanta-and-three-other-cities-for-super/nhh4s/?ecmp=ajc_social_twitter_2014_sfp)

That's great news - I'm guessing it means AT&T knows Google is about to announce Atlanta as one of its new Fiber markets.
So maybe I should hold off on the ol switch to Xfinity?

Just don't get yourself into a contract.
Excellent advice. I'm out of contract any day now.
Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: katherine77 on November 05, 2014, 11:20 am
A study by RVA LLC Market Research and Consulting found that fiber optic internet adds roughly $5,250 to the value of a $300,000 home.

http://beta.slashdot.org/story/209409 (http://beta.slashdot.org/story/209409)
Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: Andreas on November 13, 2014, 09:42 am
I think the first people getting the fast AT&T service are the ones on the old IFITL service.  Good for them though, they've been stuck on the old Bellsouth service for a long time.

Not sure what IFITL is, but the article says this will be a U-Verse service. So if you get U-Verse you'd have access to their gigabit.

It will be great to have it available, but it's going to be very pricey.


... until Google Fiber launches.

... or not.

http://arstechnica.com/business/2014/11/att-to-pause-100-city-fiber-buildout-because-of-net-neutrality-rules/ (http://arstechnica.com/business/2014/11/att-to-pause-100-city-fiber-buildout-because-of-net-neutrality-rules/)
Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: Cap'n Ken on November 13, 2014, 09:54 am
I think the first people getting the fast AT&T service are the ones on the old IFITL service.  Good for them though, they've been stuck on the old Bellsouth service for a long time.

Not sure what IFITL is, but the article says this will be a U-Verse service. So if you get U-Verse you'd have access to their gigabit.

It will be great to have it available, but it's going to be very pricey.


... until Google Fiber launches.

... or not.

http://arstechnica.com/business/2014/11/att-to-pause-100-city-fiber-buildout-because-of-net-neutrality-rules/ (http://arstechnica.com/business/2014/11/att-to-pause-100-city-fiber-buildout-because-of-net-neutrality-rules/)

I'll be curious to see if Google makes any statements about the potential common carrier classification's impact on its fiber plans. There's a not insignificant amount of risk involved in making big investments at a time of regulatory uncertainty.
Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: angryuser on November 13, 2014, 09:56 am
I think the first people getting the fast AT&T service are the ones on the old IFITL service.  Good for them though, they've been stuck on the old Bellsouth service for a long time.

Not sure what IFITL is, but the article says this will be a U-Verse service. So if you get U-Verse you'd have access to their gigabit.

It will be great to have it available, but it's going to be very pricey.


... until Google Fiber launches.

... or not.

http://arstechnica.com/business/2014/11/att-to-pause-100-city-fiber-buildout-because-of-net-neutrality-rules/ (http://arstechnica.com/business/2014/11/att-to-pause-100-city-fiber-buildout-because-of-net-neutrality-rules/)

That's just AT&T being a bag of dicks trying to influence the FCC/process.
1: They ever actually started that build-out? I'm skeptical.
2: Google won't stop theirs, and will eat AT&T's lunch if they don't keep up.
Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: Cap'n Ken on November 13, 2014, 10:12 am
I think the first people getting the fast AT&T service are the ones on the old IFITL service.  Good for them though, they've been stuck on the old Bellsouth service for a long time.

Not sure what IFITL is, but the article says this will be a U-Verse service. So if you get U-Verse you'd have access to their gigabit.

It will be great to have it available, but it's going to be very pricey.


... until Google Fiber launches.

... or not.

http://arstechnica.com/business/2014/11/att-to-pause-100-city-fiber-buildout-because-of-net-neutrality-rules/ (http://arstechnica.com/business/2014/11/att-to-pause-100-city-fiber-buildout-because-of-net-neutrality-rules/)

That's just AT&T being a bag of dicks trying to influence the FCC/process.
1: They ever actually started that build-out? I'm skeptical.
2: Google won't stop theirs, and will eat AT&T's lunch if they don't keep up.

I don't doubt AT&T's motivations - almost certainly as you described. That's why I'd be interested in Google's statement, though it would also be just as self-serving (I'd bet they would say they're moving forward as normal while their army of lawyers ponder the implications).
Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: Jack on November 13, 2014, 10:50 am
http://arstechnica.com/business/2014/11/att-to-pause-100-city-fiber-buildout-because-of-net-neutrality-rules/ (http://arstechnica.com/business/2014/11/att-to-pause-100-city-fiber-buildout-because-of-net-neutrality-rules/)

That's just AT&T being a bag of dicks trying to influence the FCC/process.
1: They ever actually started that build-out? I'm skeptical.
2: Google won't stop theirs, and will eat AT&T's lunch if they don't keep up.

Not to mention, it's bullshit because the whole "controversy" over net neutrality was manufactured in the first place.

Net neutrality is not some new thing; it's how the Internet has always worked up to this point. It's only become an issue because companies like Comcast recently decided to violate the status quo. (They see the threat to their cable TV business and want to use their privileged position as ISPs to stifle competition.)

In other words, ISPs lose nothing by being regulated as Title II Common Carriers. Their parent media conglomerates merely do not gain the ability to abuse the public to prop up their buggy-whip business models.

Oh, and by the way: let's not forget that the public has already given telcos billions of dollars in public money to subsidize their fiber build-out, and that their executives have simply pocketed that money instead. AT&T has absolutely no right whatsoever to complain!
Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: dsnation on November 13, 2014, 11:00 am
http://arstechnica.com/business/2014/11/att-to-pause-100-city-fiber-buildout-because-of-net-neutrality-rules/ (http://arstechnica.com/business/2014/11/att-to-pause-100-city-fiber-buildout-because-of-net-neutrality-rules/)

That's just AT&T being a bag of dicks trying to influence the FCC/process.
1: They ever actually started that build-out? I'm skeptical.
2: Google won't stop theirs, and will eat AT&T's lunch if they don't keep up.

Not to mention, it's bullshit because the whole "controversy" over net neutrality was manufactured in the first place.

Net neutrality is not some new thing; it's how the Internet has always worked up to this point. It's only become an issue because companies like Comcast recently decided to violate the status quo. (They see the threat to their cable TV business and want to use their privileged position as ISPs to stifle competition.)

In other words, ISPs lose nothing by being regulated as Title II Common Carriers. Their parent media conglomerates merely do not gain the ability to abuse the public to prop up their buggy-whip business models.

Actually there's huge risk for them.  Title II comes with rate setting authority from the FCC.  The president and the FCC both say they want a forbearance from rate setting, but it's not automatic and can be challenged under the statute by any individual or group via a petition process.  No company is going to do a massive build-out if they have no idea if they're going to be able to recover their investment or over what time frame.

Net neutrality is not Title II regulation.  Title II regulation is not net neutrality.  They're separate and distinct concepts. 

This is all likely academic anyway.  The FCC probably doesn't have the statutory authority to impose Title II on broadband providers.  It's been looking for a way to do so for over a decade and has failed.  I doubt the current push survives the inevitable legal challenges should the FCC attempt to do so.
Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: Cap'n Ken on November 13, 2014, 11:06 am
http://arstechnica.com/business/2014/11/att-to-pause-100-city-fiber-buildout-because-of-net-neutrality-rules/ (http://arstechnica.com/business/2014/11/att-to-pause-100-city-fiber-buildout-because-of-net-neutrality-rules/)

That's just AT&T being a bag of dicks trying to influence the FCC/process.
1: They ever actually started that build-out? I'm skeptical.
2: Google won't stop theirs, and will eat AT&T's lunch if they don't keep up.

Not to mention, it's bullshit because the whole "controversy" over net neutrality was manufactured in the first place.

Net neutrality is not some new thing; it's how the Internet has always worked up to this point. It's only become an issue because companies like Comcast recently decided to violate the status quo. (They see the threat to their cable TV business and want to use their privileged position as ISPs to stifle competition.)

In other words, ISPs lose nothing by being regulated as Title II Common Carriers. Their parent media conglomerates merely do not gain the ability to abuse the public to prop up their buggy-whip business models.

Oh, and by the way: let's not forget that the public has already given telcos billions of dollars in public money to subsidize their fiber build-out, and that their executives have simply pocketed that money instead. AT&T has absolutely no right whatsoever to complain!

I'm not sure how you can say the ISPs lose nothing by being regulated as common carriers - and I say that because we don't know yet what those regulations would mean specifically for ISPs. But if, for example, Internet services become subject to a Universal Service Fund fee (i.e. tax), then costs will rise for consumers which necessarily will have some impact on demand. And that impact on demand will necessarily affect an ISP's business plan.

Likewise, should the FCC decide that the common carrier requirement that a service provider cannot discriminate between parts of their service areas in terms of services provided means ISP's must offer the same speeds across their service market ... well there's a lot of potential impacts there.

I'm in favor of the policy goal of net neutrality, but I'm really hesitant to say the best way to get there is FCC regulation as common carriers. Everybody who favors net neutrality seems to be rushing into this "Yeah, FCC, baby!" cry, but especially given the lack of specifics as to what those regulations would entail I'm really hesitant to say such regulation is the right way to achieve the goal.
Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: Jack on November 13, 2014, 11:26 am
Actually there's huge risk for them.  Title II comes with rate setting authority from the FCC.  The president and the FCC both say they want a forbearance from rate setting, but it's not automatic and can be challenged under the statute by any individual or group via a petition process.  No company is going to do a massive build-out if they have no idea if they're going to be able to recover their investment or over what time frame.

By all rights, AT&T should already be obligated to do the build out since they accepted massive subsidies for it. In fact, the build-out should have already happened by now!

Net neutrality is not Title II regulation.  Title II regulation is not net neutrality.  They're separate and distinct concepts. 

Title II is the mechanism by which the FCC gains the authority to impose net neutrality.

This is all likely academic anyway.  The FCC probably doesn't have the statutory authority to impose Title II on broadband providers.  It's been looking for a way to do so for over a decade and has failed.  I doubt the current push survives the inevitable legal challenges should the FCC attempt to do so.

The FCC absolutely has the authority to impose Title II on ISPs. What it has been trying and failing to do is to stop short of imposing Title II while still creating regulations that only Title II empowers it to make.

Likewise, should the FCC decide that the common carrier requirement that a service provider cannot discriminate between parts of their service areas in terms of services provided means ISP's must offer the same speeds across their service market ... well there's a lot of potential impacts there.

That is not an issue for which it is reasonable to be worried about. By the same logic, the US Postal Service should be prohibited from offering bulk-rate or first-class mail merely because it's possible for customers to choose priority mail instead. That argument is nothing more than a strawman propped up by the ant-net-neutrality lobby.

I'm in favor of the policy goal of net neutrality, but I'm really hesitant to say the best way to get there is FCC regulation as common carriers. Everybody who favors net neutrality seems to be rushing into this "Yeah, FCC, baby!" cry, but especially given the lack of specifics as to what those regulations would entail I'm really hesitant to say such regulation is the right way to achieve the goal.

People who favor net neutrality want the FCC to reclassify ISPs under Title II precisely because the courts have ruled that nothing short of Title II reclassification allows net neutrality rules to be legal.
Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: Cap'n Ken on November 13, 2014, 11:37 am
Actually there's huge risk for them.  Title II comes with rate setting authority from the FCC.  The president and the FCC both say they want a forbearance from rate setting, but it's not automatic and can be challenged under the statute by any individual or group via a petition process.  No company is going to do a massive build-out if they have no idea if they're going to be able to recover their investment or over what time frame.

By all rights, AT&T should already be obligated to do the build out since they accepted massive subsidies for it. In fact, the build-out should have already happened by now!

Net neutrality is not Title II regulation.  Title II regulation is not net neutrality.  They're separate and distinct concepts. 

Title II is the mechanism by which the FCC gains the authority to impose net neutrality.

This is all likely academic anyway.  The FCC probably doesn't have the statutory authority to impose Title II on broadband providers.  It's been looking for a way to do so for over a decade and has failed.  I doubt the current push survives the inevitable legal challenges should the FCC attempt to do so.

The FCC absolutely has the authority to impose Title II on ISPs. What it has been trying and failing to do is to stop short of imposing Title II while still creating regulations that only Title II empowers it to make.

Likewise, should the FCC decide that the common carrier requirement that a service provider cannot discriminate between parts of their service areas in terms of services provided means ISP's must offer the same speeds across their service market ... well there's a lot of potential impacts there.

That is not an issue for which it is reasonable to be worried about. By the same logic, the US Postal Service should be prohibited from offering bulk-rate or first-class mail merely because it's possible for customers to choose priority mail instead. That argument is nothing more than a strawman propped up by the ant-net-neutrality lobby.

I'm in favor of the policy goal of net neutrality, but I'm really hesitant to say the best way to get there is FCC regulation as common carriers. Everybody who favors net neutrality seems to be rushing into this "Yeah, FCC, baby!" cry, but especially given the lack of specifics as to what those regulations would entail I'm really hesitant to say such regulation is the right way to achieve the goal.

People who favor net neutrality want the FCC to reclassify ISPs under Title II precisely because the courts have ruled that nothing short of Title II reclassification allows net neutrality rules to be legal.

You're really just speculating and practicing wishful thinking. Until there are actual, concrete rules proposed, there's really no intelligent argument to be made for or against the FCC move. My point is "FCC" is not a magic word that delivers the golden era of net neutrality.

The goal is clear, but how to best achieve it is muddy at best.

Is there any reason (other than its presumed lack of an ability to get anything done) that Congress could not simply pass a law under interstate trade principles banning preferential treatment of content on a network? I don't know the answer to that.

Alternatively, if we went to more of a free-market approach (perhaps requiring ISPs to lease their lines to other providers), competition could resolve the issue if consumers are so in favor of the neutral approach.

So, again, the goal is clear. But the FCC move is not defined to any sort of degree that would make somebody believe it's the right approach or even a good one.
Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: angryuser on November 13, 2014, 12:02 pm
All I want is a law that requires all data to be treated equally regardless of its source or the content of its content. So simple...
Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: Jack on November 13, 2014, 12:08 pm
You're really just speculating and practicing wishful thinking. Until there are actual, concrete rules proposed, there's really no intelligent argument to be made for or against the FCC move. My point is "FCC" is not a magic word that delivers the golden era of net neutrality.

On the contrary, actual, concrete rules have been proposed -- namely, the ones that were struck down by the courts. There is no legitimate reason to think that the FCC would propose something terrible and Draconian with Title II, because if the FCC wanted to do that it would have just gone for Title II from the beginning!

Remember: nothing whatsoever was ever stopping the FCC from reclassifiying ISPs under Title II... except for the FCC itself.

Is there any reason (other than its presumed lack of an ability to get anything done) that Congress could not simply pass a law under interstate trade principles banning preferential treatment of content on a network? I don't know the answer to that.

The reason in parentheses is the reason why we must rely on the FCC. The issue has broken along party lines (not because it's inherently partisan -- both parties get bribes from telcos and cablecos -- but because if a member of one party proposes something then all "loyal" members of the other party are required to oppose it). The Democrats have failed to pass net neutrality legislation up to this point, and given the election results, there is approximately zero chance for it to happen in the foreseeable future.

All I want is a law that requires all data to be treated equally regardless of its source or the content of its content. So simple...

It is indeed a simple issue, except for telco lobbyists' bullshit red herrings.
Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: T@Nk on November 13, 2014, 12:21 pm
except for telco lobbyists' bullshit red herrings.

Columnists in the Wall Street Journal and TIME are publishing anti-Net Neutrality op-eds without disclosing that they're taking money from ISP's (http://www.dailydot.com/politics/anti-net-neutrality-op-eds-time-wall-street-journal/)

I bet dsnation's on the take too.   ***

I keed, I keed... o%o


Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: Cap'n Ken on November 13, 2014, 12:30 pm
You're really just speculating and practicing wishful thinking. Until there are actual, concrete rules proposed, there's really no intelligent argument to be made for or against the FCC move. My point is "FCC" is not a magic word that delivers the golden era of net neutrality.

On the contrary, actual, concrete rules have been proposed -- namely, the ones that were struck down by the courts. There is no legitimate reason to think that the FCC would propose something terrible and Draconian with Title II, because if the FCC wanted to do that it would have just gone for Title II from the beginning!

Remember: nothing whatsoever was ever stopping the FCC from reclassifiying ISPs under Title II... except for the FCC itself.

Is there any reason (other than its presumed lack of an ability to get anything done) that Congress could not simply pass a law under interstate trade principles banning preferential treatment of content on a network? I don't know the answer to that.

The reason in parentheses is the reason why we must rely on the FCC. The issue has broken along party lines (not because it's inherently partisan -- both parties get bribes from telcos and cablecos -- but because if a member of one party proposes something then all "loyal" members of the other party are required to oppose it). The Democrats have failed to pass net neutrality legislation up to this point, and given the election results, there is approximately zero chance for it to happen in the foreseeable future.

All I want is a law that requires all data to be treated equally regardless of its source or the content of its content. So simple...

It is indeed a simple issue, except for telco lobbyists' bullshit red herrings.

And yet again you assume that what was proposed before would be proposed exactly the same again. It's pretty simple: let me see the proposal and I'll tell you what I think about it. Otherwise, I remain skeptical of an FCC regulatory approach.

As for it being a really simple problem to solve except that the lawmakers refusing to make the simple, reasonable and desired law ... that's the fault of all you people who vote for them.
Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: dsnation on November 13, 2014, 12:30 pm
Actually there's huge risk for them.  Title II comes with rate setting authority from the FCC.  The president and the FCC both say they want a forbearance from rate setting, but it's not automatic and can be challenged under the statute by any individual or group via a petition process.  No company is going to do a massive build-out if they have no idea if they're going to be able to recover their investment or over what time frame.

By all rights, AT&T should already be obligated to do the build out since they accepted massive subsidies for it. In fact, the build-out should have already happened by now!

"By all rights" except the terms of the subsidy that they accepted.  Are subsidies a bad idea?  Generally yes.  Did the subsidies obligate AT&T to do anything by a specific date?  No.  It's a bucket of money that AT&T (amongst others) can access.  Their obligations are minimal (that was one of the main criticisms of the DirectTV deal that lead to the majority of the subsidies).

Net neutrality is not Title II regulation.  Title II regulation is not net neutrality.  They're separate and distinct concepts. 

Title II is the mechanism by which the FCC gains the authority to impose net neutrality.

Title II imposes a ton of regulations.  Net neutrality is not actually one of them.  The FCC would have to write a separate rule to impose net neutrality upon the broadband providers who would not be subject to Title II.

This is all likely academic anyway.  The FCC probably doesn't have the statutory authority to impose Title II on broadband providers.  It's been looking for a way to do so for over a decade and has failed.  I doubt the current push survives the inevitable legal challenges should the FCC attempt to do so.

The FCC absolutely has the authority to impose Title II on ISPs. What it has been trying and failing to do is to stop short of imposing Title II while still creating regulations that only Title II empowers it to make.

I think you're incorrect.  So did the DC Circuit and the Supreme Court when they considered an attempt to overturn the prior Title I classification in 2005 (NCTA v. Brand X - interesting Thomas/Scalia split over Chevron deference if you're in to that sort of thing).  The FCC is attempting to use a different part of the statute now to reclassify broadband generally as a common carrier. 



People who favor net neutrality want the FCC to reclassify ISPs under Title II precisely because the courts have ruled that nothing short of Title II reclassification allows net neutrality rules to be legal.

Or you could push legislation instead of administrative rule making.  Using Title II is the proverbial killing a fly with a bazooka.  Sure, you may get net neutrality rules, but you also get further entrenched local monopolies with government mandated profit-making rates creating a disincentive to innovate.  It's a shitty tool to achieve a questionable goal.
Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: dsnation on November 13, 2014, 12:34 pm
except for telco lobbyists' bullshit red herrings.

Columnists in the Wall Street Journal and TIME are publishing anti-Net Neutrality op-eds without disclosing that they're taking money from ISP's (http://www.dailydot.com/politics/anti-net-neutrality-op-eds-time-wall-street-journal/)

I bet dsnation's on the take too.   ***

I keed, I keed... o%o

I wish.  I'm agnostic as to "net neutrality" (a term that has essentially lost all meaning).  I'm opposed to Title II because it would kill any market reforms.  I actually suspect that Comcast, TWC, etc. are quietly pushing for Title II because they could use it to exclude new entrants to the market (e.g. mobile broadband).  Sort of a "please don't throw me into the briar patch" move.
Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: Cap'n Ken on November 13, 2014, 12:35 pm
Using Title II is the proverbial killing a fly with a bazooka.  Sure, you may get net neutrality rules, but you also get further entrenched local monopolies with government mandated profit-making rates creating a disincentive to innovate.  It's a shitty tool to achieve a questionable goal.

Cutting to the chase.
Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: Jack on November 13, 2014, 01:19 pm
By all rights, AT&T should already be obligated to do the build out since they accepted massive subsidies for it. In fact, the build-out should have already happened by now!

"By all rights" except the terms of the subsidy that they accepted.  Are subsidies a bad idea?  Generally yes.  Did the subsidies obligate AT&T to do anything by a specific date?  No.  It's a bucket of money that AT&T (amongst others) can access.  Their obligations are minimal (that was one of the main criticisms of the DirectTV deal that lead to the majority of the subsidies).

Right, and the fact that the government fucked up by failing to legally enforce those moral obligations does not in any way contradict the idea that said moral obligations exist.

Net neutrality is not Title II regulation.  Title II regulation is not net neutrality.  They're separate and distinct concepts. 

Title II is the mechanism by which the FCC gains the authority to impose net neutrality.

Title II imposes a ton of regulations.  Net neutrality is not actually one of them.  The FCC would have to write a separate rule to impose net neutrality upon the broadband providers who would not be subject to Title II.

This is all likely academic anyway.  The FCC probably doesn't have the statutory authority to impose Title II on broadband providers.  It's been looking for a way to do so for over a decade and has failed.  I doubt the current push survives the inevitable legal challenges should the FCC attempt to do so.

The FCC absolutely has the authority to impose Title II on ISPs. What it has been trying and failing to do is to stop short of imposing Title II while still creating regulations that only Title II empowers it to make.

I think you're incorrect.  So did the DC Circuit and the Supreme Court when they considered an attempt to overturn the prior Title I classification in 2005 (NCTA v. Brand X - interesting Thomas/Scalia split over Chevron deference if you're in to that sort of thing).  The FCC is attempting to use a different part of the statute now to reclassify broadband generally as a common carrier. 

No. In NCTA v Brand X, Brand X was attempting to force the FCC to reclassify against its wishes, and by upholding the principle of Chevron deference the court ruled that the FCC was empowered to decide for itself.

The FCC hasn't wanted, up to this point, to reclassify ISPs under Title II because ISPs prefer to be under Title I (where they can have their cake and eat it too). It bowed to political pressure to impose net neutrality, but attempted to do it under Title I (in the Open Internet Order of 2010). The court struck that down (http://www.cadc.uscourts.gov/internet/opinions.nsf/3AF8B4D938CDEEA685257C6000532062/$file/11-1355-1474943.pdf), ruling that the FCC could impose net neutrality, but would have to reclassify ISPs under Title II first.

Now, the FCC is being lobbied to voluntarily decide to reclassify ISPs under Title II, which is exactly what NCTA v Brand X affirmed that it has the authority to do, and what Verizon v FCC ruled that it must do, in order to give itself the authority to subsequently write net neutrality rules.

As should be very, very clear by now, net neutrality and Title II are related in that Title II is a strict prerequisite (per the courts) for net neutrality. Title II does not automatically cause net neutrality, but net neutrality cannot happen without it. In order to accomplish net neutrality, the FCC must make ISPs into Title II Common Carriers and then write a net neutrality rule for them.

Or you could push legislation instead of administrative rule making.

I could also push praying to the almighty Flying Spaghetti Monster to smite the telcos and cablecos with Its noodly appendage (RAmen!)... and doing so would be equally effective.

I'm agnostic as to "net neutrality" (a term that has essentially lost all meaning).

... precisely due to the efforts of telco shills to muddy the waters. Until they got involved, it was well understood that it was exactly as angryuser defined it.

  I'm opposed to Title II because it would kill any market reforms.

Are you seriously trying to argue that "market reforms" are even slightly relevant to the broadband industry, which is dominated by de-jure monopolies?
Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: Cap'n Ken on November 13, 2014, 01:58 pm
Are you seriously trying to argue that "market reforms" are even slightly relevant to the broadband industry, which is dominated by de-jure monopolies?

... He asks in the thread about Google Fiber coming to Atlanta.

The fact is we are in a time of tremendous innovation in terms of access. Regulation of Internet access as a public utility is more likely to have negative than positive effects on innovation.

Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: T@Nk on November 13, 2014, 02:11 pm
Are you seriously trying to argue that "market reforms" are even slightly relevant to the broadband industry, which is dominated by de-jure monopolies?

... He asks in the thread about Google Fiber coming to Atlanta.

Which is a BFD because of the monopolies that exist with access to high-speed internet.

Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: Cap'n Ken on November 13, 2014, 02:21 pm
Are you seriously trying to argue that "market reforms" are even slightly relevant to the broadband industry, which is dominated by de-jure monopolies?

... He asks in the thread about Google Fiber coming to Atlanta.

Which is a BFD because of the monopolies that exist with access to high-speed internet.

By "BFD" I assume you mean "market solution"?

Sure, if not for the emergence of Google Fiber, the potential for wireless to actually be fast someday, guys like Elon Musk looking at launching tiny satellites for access, etc. "utility" type regulation would make more sense. But we are in a time where the phone/cable duopoly is losing market power and competition is growing. Shoving this industry into the "regulated utility" category would dampen innovation, and especially when the goal is something other than regulating them like that - well it seems like a bad idea.
Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: Jack on November 13, 2014, 03:02 pm
Are you seriously trying to argue that "market reforms" are even slightly relevant to the broadband industry, which is dominated by de-jure monopolies?

... He asks in the thread about Google Fiber coming to Atlanta.

Which is a BFD because of the monopolies that exist with access to high-speed internet.

By "BFD" I assume you mean "market solution"?

Sure, if not for the emergence of Google Fiber, the potential for wireless to actually be fast someday, guys like Elon Musk looking at launching tiny satellites for access, etc. "utility" type regulation would make more sense. But we are in a time where the phone/cable duopoly is losing market power and competition is growing. Shoving this industry into the "regulated utility" category would dampen innovation, and especially when the goal is something other than regulating them like that - well it seems like a bad idea.

First of all, "Google has to go make some sort of political deal with Atlanta's city government" is not even close to a market solution!

Second, telecommunications have always been in the "regulated utility" category. You're creating some sort of imaginary false choice where if the FCC does nothing the magical Free Market will make everything better, but that does not reflect reality.

Reality is that wired infrastructure will always be a natural monopoly and wireless spectrum will always be scarce (due to the laws of physics), and thus telecommunications must always be regulated as utilities. The only other choice would be to ignore those fundamental facts, and by doing so allow the telcos to screw us all over.

Here are the facts:
You can "wish" a free market existed all you want, but that won't make it so.
Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: Cap'n Ken on November 13, 2014, 03:11 pm
Are you seriously trying to argue that "market reforms" are even slightly relevant to the broadband industry, which is dominated by de-jure monopolies?

... He asks in the thread about Google Fiber coming to Atlanta.

Which is a BFD because of the monopolies that exist with access to high-speed internet.

By "BFD" I assume you mean "market solution"?

Sure, if not for the emergence of Google Fiber, the potential for wireless to actually be fast someday, guys like Elon Musk looking at launching tiny satellites for access, etc. "utility" type regulation would make more sense. But we are in a time where the phone/cable duopoly is losing market power and competition is growing. Shoving this industry into the "regulated utility" category would dampen innovation, and especially when the goal is something other than regulating them like that - well it seems like a bad idea.

First of all, "Google has to go make some sort of political deal with Atlanta's city government" is not even close to a market solution!

Second, telecommunications have always been in the "regulated utility" category. You're creating some sort of imaginary false choice where if the FCC does nothing the magical Free Market will make everything better, but that does not reflect reality.

Reality is that wired infrastructure will always be a natural monopoly and wireless spectrum will always be scarce (due to the laws of physics), and thus telecommunications must always be regulated as utilities. The only other choice would be to ignore those fundamental facts, and by doing so allow the telcos to screw us all over.

Here are the facts:
  • If you want to create a wireless ISP, you must be regulated by the FCC or else you'll end up jamming everyone else's transmissions.
  • If you want to create a wired ISP, you must be regulated by the local government or else you won't be able to get permission (from every single individual property owner) to run your wires.
You can "wish" a free market existed all you want, but that won't make it so.

Yes, wired services require local authorization. I'd love to see those rules loosened up, but there are practical considerations. Federal regulation is hardly a move in the "market" direction there.

As for wireless, the FCC could - but has so far failed to - open up much more spectrum for experimental and innovative services. Because that's how government regulation works.


Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: Cap'n Ken on November 13, 2014, 03:15 pm
Are you seriously trying to argue that "market reforms" are even slightly relevant to the broadband industry, which is dominated by de-jure monopolies?

... He asks in the thread about Google Fiber coming to Atlanta.

Which is a BFD because of the monopolies that exist with access to high-speed internet.

By "BFD" I assume you mean "market solution"?

Sure, if not for the emergence of Google Fiber, the potential for wireless to actually be fast someday, guys like Elon Musk looking at launching tiny satellites for access, etc. "utility" type regulation would make more sense. But we are in a time where the phone/cable duopoly is losing market power and competition is growing. Shoving this industry into the "regulated utility" category would dampen innovation, and especially when the goal is something other than regulating them like that - well it seems like a bad idea.

First of all, "Google has to go make some sort of political deal with Atlanta's city government" is not even close to a market solution!

Second, telecommunications have always been in the "regulated utility" category. You're creating some sort of imaginary false choice where if the FCC does nothing the magical Free Market will make everything better, but that does not reflect reality.

Reality is that wired infrastructure will always be a natural monopoly and wireless spectrum will always be scarce (due to the laws of physics), and thus telecommunications must always be regulated as utilities. The only other choice would be to ignore those fundamental facts, and by doing so allow the telcos to screw us all over.

Here are the facts:
  • If you want to create a wireless ISP, you must be regulated by the FCC or else you'll end up jamming everyone else's transmissions.
  • If you want to create a wired ISP, you must be regulated by the local government or else you won't be able to get permission (from every single individual property owner) to run your wires.
You can "wish" a free market existed all you want, but that won't make it so.

Also, I love your "LOL!!! FREE MARKET!!!" response.
Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: dsnation on November 13, 2014, 03:25 pm
By all rights, AT&T should already be obligated to do the build out since they accepted massive subsidies for it. In fact, the build-out should have already happened by now!

"By all rights" except the terms of the subsidy that they accepted.  Are subsidies a bad idea?  Generally yes.  Did the subsidies obligate AT&T to do anything by a specific date?  No.  It's a bucket of money that AT&T (amongst others) can access.  Their obligations are minimal (that was one of the main criticisms of the DirectTV deal that lead to the majority of the subsidies).

Right, and the fact that the government fucked up by failing to legally enforce those moral obligations does not in any way contradict the idea that said moral obligations exist.

Good luck enforcing a moral obligation in Court.  The government agreed to terms that were probably overly generous to AT&T and you (among many others) are disappointed in the result.  If anything, that should caution against further government involvement and additional unintended consequences.




Net neutrality is not Title II regulation.  Title II regulation is not net neutrality.  They're separate and distinct concepts. 

Title II is the mechanism by which the FCC gains the authority to impose net neutrality.

Title II imposes a ton of regulations.  Net neutrality is not actually one of them.  The FCC would have to write a separate rule to impose net neutrality upon the broadband providers who would not be subject to Title II.



No. In NCTA v Brand X, Brand X was attempting to force the FCC to reclassify against its wishes, and by upholding the principle of Chevron deference the court ruled that the FCC was empowered to decide for itself.

The FCC hasn't wanted, up to this point, to reclassify ISPs under Title II because ISPs prefer to be under Title I (where they can have their cake and eat it too). It bowed to political pressure to impose net neutrality, but attempted to do it under Title I (in the Open Internet Order of 2010). The court struck that down (http://www.cadc.uscourts.gov/internet/opinions.nsf/3AF8B4D938CDEEA685257C6000532062/$file/11-1355-1474943.pdf), ruling that the FCC could impose net neutrality, but would have to reclassify ISPs under Title II first.

Now, the FCC is being lobbied to voluntarily decide to reclassify ISPs under Title II, which is exactly what NCTA v Brand X affirmed that it has the authority to do, and what Verizon v FCC ruled that it must do, in order to give itself the authority to subsequently write net neutrality rules.

As should be very, very clear by now, net neutrality and Title II are related in that Title II is a strict prerequisite (per the courts) for net neutrality. Title II does not automatically cause net neutrality, but net neutrality cannot happen without it. In order to accomplish net neutrality, the FCC must make ISPs into Title II Common Carriers and then write a net neutrality rule for them.

That's not how administrative rule-making and Chevron deference work.  Once an agency issues a final order and substantive rule, it has the effect of law.  Without an intervening change in circumstance, that final order and rule cannot simply be undone.  In Brand X, the FCC initially ruled that there was no ambiguity in the statute and that ISPs were clearly "information services."  Brand X attempted to overturn that through the Courts.  The Courts found vagueness under the statute and based on Chevron deference, upheld the classification.  But you have to go back to the original FCC declaratory ruling - that there is no ambiguity or vagueness in the statute.  That is the decision that is entitled to deference.  The FCC cannot now go back and claim statutory vagueness when it previously held none existed.

Or you could push legislation instead of administrative rule making.

I could also push praying to the almighty Flying Spaghetti Monster to smite the telcos and cablecos with Its noodly appendage (RAmen!)... and doing so would be equally effective.

Right.  Legislation is hard so let's fuck everything up. 

I'm agnostic as to "net neutrality" (a term that has essentially lost all meaning).

... precisely due to the efforts of telco shills to muddy the waters. Until they got involved, it was well understood that it was exactly as angryuser defined it.
It's proponents have done a fine job of muddying the waters as well. 

  I'm opposed to Title II because it would kill any market reforms.

Are you seriously trying to argue that "market reforms" are even slightly relevant to the broadband industry, which is dominated by de-jure monopolies?

As the Cap'n points out, this thread started about a new market entrant - Google.  Title II regulation would effectively prevent new entrants, whether via fiber, mobile, satellite, or some new technology.  Subjecting broadband ISPs to Title II wouldn't just be a way to screw Comcast, it would apply to every Broadband provider, even your cell phone.  The only way around that is to change the law.
Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: J. Grouchy on November 13, 2014, 03:25 pm
This thread isn't fun anymore.   :lala:
Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: Folsom on November 13, 2014, 03:25 pm
Are you seriously trying to argue that "market reforms" are even slightly relevant to the broadband industry, which is dominated by de-jure monopolies?

... He asks in the thread about Google Fiber coming to Atlanta.

Which is a BFD because of the monopolies that exist with access to high-speed internet.

By "BFD" I assume you mean "market solution"?

Sure, if not for the emergence of Google Fiber, the potential for wireless to actually be fast someday, guys like Elon Musk looking at launching tiny satellites for access, etc. "utility" type regulation would make more sense. But we are in a time where the phone/cable duopoly is losing market power and competition is growing. Shoving this industry into the "regulated utility" category would dampen innovation, and especially when the goal is something other than regulating them like that - well it seems like a bad idea.

First of all, "Google has to go make some sort of political deal with Atlanta's city government" is not even close to a market solution!

Second, telecommunications have always been in the "regulated utility" category. You're creating some sort of imaginary false choice where if the FCC does nothing the magical Free Market will make everything better, but that does not reflect reality.

Reality is that wired infrastructure will always be a natural monopoly and wireless spectrum will always be scarce (due to the laws of physics), and thus telecommunications must always be regulated as utilities. The only other choice would be to ignore those fundamental facts, and by doing so allow the telcos to screw us all over.

Here are the facts:
  • If you want to create a wireless ISP, you must be regulated by the FCC or else you'll end up jamming everyone else's transmissions.
  • If you want to create a wired ISP, you must be regulated by the local government or else you won't be able to get permission (from every single individual property owner) to run your wires.
You can "wish" a free market existed all you want, but that won't make it so.

Yes, wired services require local authorization. I'd love to see those rules loosened up, but there are practical considerations. Federal regulation is hardly a move in the "market" direction there.

As for wireless, the FCC could - but has so far failed to - open up much more spectrum for experimental and innovative services. Because that's how government regulation works.

The FCC has already opened up a lot of spectrum, where do you think the LTE frequencies came from?

There's a lot of work that has to go into allowing operators in various frequency bands - look at Light Squared getting denied.  You have to take into account interoperability between devices.
Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: Cap'n Ken on November 13, 2014, 03:38 pm
Are you seriously trying to argue that "market reforms" are even slightly relevant to the broadband industry, which is dominated by de-jure monopolies?

... He asks in the thread about Google Fiber coming to Atlanta.

Which is a BFD because of the monopolies that exist with access to high-speed internet.

By "BFD" I assume you mean "market solution"?

Sure, if not for the emergence of Google Fiber, the potential for wireless to actually be fast someday, guys like Elon Musk looking at launching tiny satellites for access, etc. "utility" type regulation would make more sense. But we are in a time where the phone/cable duopoly is losing market power and competition is growing. Shoving this industry into the "regulated utility" category would dampen innovation, and especially when the goal is something other than regulating them like that - well it seems like a bad idea.

First of all, "Google has to go make some sort of political deal with Atlanta's city government" is not even close to a market solution!

Second, telecommunications have always been in the "regulated utility" category. You're creating some sort of imaginary false choice where if the FCC does nothing the magical Free Market will make everything better, but that does not reflect reality.

Reality is that wired infrastructure will always be a natural monopoly and wireless spectrum will always be scarce (due to the laws of physics), and thus telecommunications must always be regulated as utilities. The only other choice would be to ignore those fundamental facts, and by doing so allow the telcos to screw us all over.

Here are the facts:
  • If you want to create a wireless ISP, you must be regulated by the FCC or else you'll end up jamming everyone else's transmissions.
  • If you want to create a wired ISP, you must be regulated by the local government or else you won't be able to get permission (from every single individual property owner) to run your wires.
You can "wish" a free market existed all you want, but that won't make it so.

Yes, wired services require local authorization. I'd love to see those rules loosened up, but there are practical considerations. Federal regulation is hardly a move in the "market" direction there.

As for wireless, the FCC could - but has so far failed to - open up much more spectrum for experimental and innovative services. Because that's how government regulation works.

The FCC has already opened up a lot of spectrum, where do you think the LTE frequencies came from?

There's a lot of work that has to go into allowing operators in various frequency bands - look at Light Squared getting denied.  You have to take into account interoperability between devices.

Well of course they license a lot of spectrum. They also drag their feet on a lot of potential innovative use and re-use of spectrum. That's just sort of the nature of regulation, but also why creating new regulatory schemes shouldn't be taken lightly.
Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: Folsom on November 13, 2014, 04:02 pm
Are you seriously trying to argue that "market reforms" are even slightly relevant to the broadband industry, which is dominated by de-jure monopolies?

... He asks in the thread about Google Fiber coming to Atlanta.

Which is a BFD because of the monopolies that exist with access to high-speed internet.

By "BFD" I assume you mean "market solution"?

Sure, if not for the emergence of Google Fiber, the potential for wireless to actually be fast someday, guys like Elon Musk looking at launching tiny satellites for access, etc. "utility" type regulation would make more sense. But we are in a time where the phone/cable duopoly is losing market power and competition is growing. Shoving this industry into the "regulated utility" category would dampen innovation, and especially when the goal is something other than regulating them like that - well it seems like a bad idea.

First of all, "Google has to go make some sort of political deal with Atlanta's city government" is not even close to a market solution!

Second, telecommunications have always been in the "regulated utility" category. You're creating some sort of imaginary false choice where if the FCC does nothing the magical Free Market will make everything better, but that does not reflect reality.

Reality is that wired infrastructure will always be a natural monopoly and wireless spectrum will always be scarce (due to the laws of physics), and thus telecommunications must always be regulated as utilities. The only other choice would be to ignore those fundamental facts, and by doing so allow the telcos to screw us all over.

Here are the facts:
  • If you want to create a wireless ISP, you must be regulated by the FCC or else you'll end up jamming everyone else's transmissions.
  • If you want to create a wired ISP, you must be regulated by the local government or else you won't be able to get permission (from every single individual property owner) to run your wires.
You can "wish" a free market existed all you want, but that won't make it so.

Yes, wired services require local authorization. I'd love to see those rules loosened up, but there are practical considerations. Federal regulation is hardly a move in the "market" direction there.

As for wireless, the FCC could - but has so far failed to - open up much more spectrum for experimental and innovative services. Because that's how government regulation works.

The FCC has already opened up a lot of spectrum, where do you think the LTE frequencies came from?

There's a lot of work that has to go into allowing operators in various frequency bands - look at Light Squared getting denied.  You have to take into account interoperability between devices.

Well of course they license a lot of spectrum. They also drag their feet on a lot of potential innovative use and re-use of spectrum. That's just sort of the nature of regulation, but also why creating new regulatory schemes shouldn't be taken lightly.

The LTE bands were re-use from TV spectrum.  There is very little spectrum that is not already licensed/allocated. 
Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: Jack on November 13, 2014, 04:14 pm
Yes, wired services require local authorization. I'd love to see those rules loosened up, but there are practical considerations. Federal regulation is hardly a move in the "market" direction there.

You keep trying to pretend that the federal regulation being discussed is somehow "new." It isn't. Wired telecommunications have always been regulated. In fact, ISPs should always have been regulated as Title II Common Carriers, because that's what they truly are. All that's going on here is fixing that mistake, and your "new regulation" boogeyman does not actually exist.

Not to mention, as a website owner, you should agree! Don't you realize that without net neutrality, (for example) NextDoor.com could strike a deal with Comcast to block EAVBuzz?

If anything, that should caution against further government involvement and additional unintended consequences.

If anything, it should caution against giving the telcos yet another damn handout by allowing them to force content providers to pay a ransom in order to reach their subscribers!

Title II imposes a ton of regulations.  Net neutrality is not actually one of them.  The FCC would have to write a separate rule to impose net neutrality upon the broadband providers who would not be subject to Title II.

You keep repeating yourself like a broken record, yet fail to respond to what I was actually saying:

In order to impose net neutrality on ISPs, the FCC must first make ISPs subject to Title II and then write a rule to impose net neutrality on entities subject to Title II. The FCC very specifically cannot impose net neutrality on Title I Information Services; the courts said so. The FCC must reclassify them as Title II before it can even think about net neutrality. Net neutrality is not a requirement of Title II, but Title II is a requirement of net neutrality. The phrase "impose net neutrality upon the broadband providers who would not be subject to Title II" is nonsense because it is not possible to impose net neutrality on them unless they were also reclassified to Title II.

That's not how administrative rule-making and Chevron deference work.  Once an agency issues a final order and substantive rule, it has the effect of law.  Without an intervening change in circumstance, that final order and rule cannot simply be undone.  In Brand X, the FCC initially ruled that there was no ambiguity in the statute and that ISPs were clearly "information services."  Brand X attempted to overturn that through the Courts.  The Courts found vagueness under the statute and based on Chevron deference, upheld the classification.  But you have to go back to the original FCC declaratory ruling - that there is no ambiguity or vagueness in the statute.  That is the decision that is entitled to deference.  The FCC cannot now go back and claim statutory vagueness when it previously held none existed.

The FCC doesn't have to claim "statutory vagueness;" all it has to do is claim the right to change it's own mind!

The FCC made the rule; the FCC can change the rule. The idea that it could somehow be otherwise is tautologically absurd.

Title II regulation would effectively prevent new entrants, whether via fiber, mobile, satellite, or some new technology.

Do you have any actual evidence to back that assertion up? I ask because otherwise, I could just respond "nuh uh!" and be equally persuasive.

Notwithstanding the fact that I didn't need to provide any actual evidence in order to refute your argument, I will do so anyway: Title II cannot possibly do any harm to new entrants (unless the FCC wants it to) because the FCC has the authority to choose not to enforce (https://www.fcc.gov/encyclopedia/Forbearance) any part of it. In fact, the proposal FCC Chairman Wheeler released even says the the FCC would likely forbear from applying all but sections 201, 202, 208, 222, 254, and 255 of Title II.
Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: Cap'n Ken on November 13, 2014, 04:40 pm
Yes, wired services require local authorization. I'd love to see those rules loosened up, but there are practical considerations. Federal regulation is hardly a move in the "market" direction there.

You keep trying to pretend that the federal regulation being discussed is somehow "new." It isn't. Wired telecommunications have always been regulated. In fact, ISPs should always have been regulated as Title II Common Carriers, because that's what they truly are. All that's going on here is fixing that mistake, and your "new regulation" boogeyman does not actually exist.

Not to mention, as a website owner, you should agree! Don't you realize that without net neutrality, (for example) NextDoor.com could strike a deal with Comcast to block EAVBuzz?

If there's a regulatory anomaly that has prevented ISPs from being regulated as utilities ... then I'm happy that's how it worked out. And whatever "should" have been the case, we're looking at an industry that's 20 years old and exists as it does now. So putting it into a regulatory regime now would be new and different. You're leaning on a theoretical regulatory history that doesn't exist to argue that reality is something different than it is.

And I'm really curious why - given that net neutrality isn't in place - Comcast hasn't struck a deal with NextDoor.com and blocked EAVBuzz.
Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: angryuser on November 13, 2014, 04:47 pm
Yes, wired services require local authorization. I'd love to see those rules loosened up, but there are practical considerations. Federal regulation is hardly a move in the "market" direction there.

You keep trying to pretend that the federal regulation being discussed is somehow "new." It isn't. Wired telecommunications have always been regulated. In fact, ISPs should always have been regulated as Title II Common Carriers, because that's what they truly are. All that's going on here is fixing that mistake, and your "new regulation" boogeyman does not actually exist.

Not to mention, as a website owner, you should agree! Don't you realize that without net neutrality, (for example) NextDoor.com could strike a deal with Comcast to block EAVBuzz?

If there's a regulatory anomaly that has prevented ISPs from being regulated as utilities ... then I'm happy that's how it worked out. And whatever "should" have been the case, we're looking at an industry that's 20 years old and exists as it does now. So putting it into a regulatory regime now would be new and different. You're leaning on a theoretical regulatory history that doesn't exist to argue that reality is something different than it is.

And I'm really curious why - given that net neutrality isn't in place - Comcast hasn't struck a deal with NextDoor.com and blocked EAVBuzz.

Well, they did throttle Netflix until Netflix caved and paid the extortion fee. Maybe you're on the list and they just haven't worked their way down to you yet.
Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: dsnation on November 13, 2014, 04:48 pm
Yes, wired services require local authorization. I'd love to see those rules loosened up, but there are practical considerations. Federal regulation is hardly a move in the "market" direction there.

You keep trying to pretend that the federal regulation being discussed is somehow "new." It isn't. Wired telecommunications have always been regulated. In fact, ISPs should always have been regulated as Title II Common Carriers, because that's what they truly are. All that's going on here is fixing that mistake, and your "new regulation" boogeyman does not actually exist.

Not to mention, as a website owner, you should agree! Don't you realize that without net neutrality, (for example) NextDoor.com could strike a deal with Comcast to block EAVBuzz?

If ISPs haven't previously been regulated as common carriers and the FCC now seeks to do so, that's "new regulation."  It isn't a bogeyman, it's a recognition that regulations come with a panoply of consequences, including increased costs and decreased innovations.  The "wired telecommunications" that have been regulated are phone lines in the era of the party line.  ISPs and broadband service providers have never been subject to Title II regulation. 


If anything, that should caution against further government involvement and additional unintended consequences.

If anything, it should caution against giving the telcos yet another damn handout by allowing them to force content providers to pay a ransom in order to reach their subscribers!

And that hasn't happened.  The Comcast-Netflix dispute is the closest thing and that was settled without need of government intervention.  You've got a solution in search of a problem.

Title II imposes a ton of regulations.  Net neutrality is not actually one of them.  The FCC would have to write a separate rule to impose net neutrality upon the broadband providers who would not be subject to Title II.

You keep repeating yourself like a broken record, yet fail to respond to what I was actually saying:

In order to impose net neutrality on ISPs, the FCC must first make ISPs subject to Title II and then write a rule to impose net neutrality on entities subject to Title II. The FCC very specifically cannot impose net neutrality on Title I Information Services; the courts said so. The FCC must reclassify them as Title II before it can even think about net neutrality. Net neutrality is not a requirement of Title II, but Title II is a requirement of net neutrality. The phrase "impose net neutrality upon the broadband providers who would not be subject to Title II" is nonsense because it is not possible to impose net neutrality on them unless they were also reclassified to Title II.

I addressed this previously.  Title II is only necessary if you're unwilling to seek new legislation for net neutrality.  Title II imposes significantly higher costs far and above simply allowing the FCC to issue a net neutrality rule.  As I said before, this is using a bazooka to slay an ant.


That's not how administrative rule-making and Chevron deference work.  Once an agency issues a final order and substantive rule, it has the effect of law.  Without an intervening change in circumstance, that final order and rule cannot simply be undone.  In Brand X, the FCC initially ruled that there was no ambiguity in the statute and that ISPs were clearly "information services."  Brand X attempted to overturn that through the Courts.  The Courts found vagueness under the statute and based on Chevron deference, upheld the classification.  But you have to go back to the original FCC declaratory ruling - that there is no ambiguity or vagueness in the statute.  That is the decision that is entitled to deference.  The FCC cannot now go back and claim statutory vagueness when it previously held none existed.

The FCC doesn't have to claim "statutory vagueness;" all it has to do is claim the right to change it's own mind!

The FCC made the rule; the FCC can change the rule. The idea that it could somehow be otherwise is tautologically absurd.

What you call "tautologically absurd" the APA calls "arbitrary and capricious."  An Agency can't just "change it's mind" absent an intervening change in fact or law.  There hasn't been one.  Feel free to argue against half a century of DC Circuit precedent.

Title II regulation would effectively prevent new entrants, whether via fiber, mobile, satellite, or some new technology.

Do you have any actual evidence to back that assertion up? I ask because otherwise, I could just respond "nuh uh!" and be equally persuasive.

Notwithstanding the fact that I didn't need to provide any actual evidence in order to refute your argument, I will do so anyway: Title II cannot possibly do any harm to new entrants (unless the FCC wants it to) because the FCC has the authority to choose not to enforce (https://www.fcc.gov/encyclopedia/Forbearance) any part of it. In fact, the proposal FCC Chairman Wheeler released even says the the FCC would likely forbear from applying all but sections 201, 202, 208, 222, 254, and 255 of Title II.

Forbearance isn't an agency "choice" nor is it automatic.  It requires an individualized petition from each entity that seeks a forbearance and specific findings of fact for each forbearance.  Assuming each petition for any proposed new entrant is granted, any party, including its competitors, can petition the FCC to overturn the forbearance, then appeal a Circuit Court.  The FCC may wish to forbear those sections, but it isn't discretionary in the manner you describe.   

Here's a quick question for you - name a new entrant to a Title II market.  I don't mean a spinoff or a break-up.  An actual new entrant. 
Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: Cap'n Ken on November 13, 2014, 04:57 pm
Yes, wired services require local authorization. I'd love to see those rules loosened up, but there are practical considerations. Federal regulation is hardly a move in the "market" direction there.

You keep trying to pretend that the federal regulation being discussed is somehow "new." It isn't. Wired telecommunications have always been regulated. In fact, ISPs should always have been regulated as Title II Common Carriers, because that's what they truly are. All that's going on here is fixing that mistake, and your "new regulation" boogeyman does not actually exist.

Not to mention, as a website owner, you should agree! Don't you realize that without net neutrality, (for example) NextDoor.com could strike a deal with Comcast to block EAVBuzz?

If there's a regulatory anomaly that has prevented ISPs from being regulated as utilities ... then I'm happy that's how it worked out. And whatever "should" have been the case, we're looking at an industry that's 20 years old and exists as it does now. So putting it into a regulatory regime now would be new and different. You're leaning on a theoretical regulatory history that doesn't exist to argue that reality is something different than it is.

And I'm really curious why - given that net neutrality isn't in place - Comcast hasn't struck a deal with NextDoor.com and blocked EAVBuzz.

Well, they did throttle Netflix until Netflix caved and paid the extortion fee. Maybe you're on the list and they just haven't worked their way down to you yet.

Maybe if my planned EAVideo service really takes off ..

Comcast / Netflix wasn't about Comcast striking a deal with Hulu to slow down Netflix (to use Jack's example model). It was about Comcast extracting revenue from Netflix because of the traffic load Netflix was putting on Comcast's network. Debate the merits of either side's case there, but it wasn't treating Company B traffic differently because of a deal made with Company A.
Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: Jack on November 13, 2014, 05:10 pm
If ISPs haven't previously been regulated as common carriers and the FCC now seeks to do so, that's "new regulation."  It isn't a bogeyman, it's a recognition that regulations come with a panoply of consequences, including increased costs and decreased innovations.

No, this is a change in regulation. For all you know, being classified as Title I might cost more than being classified as Title II. For all you know, being reclassified as Title II might make ISPs more innovative than they were under Title I.

If anything, it should caution against giving the telcos yet another damn handout by allowing them to force content providers to pay a ransom in order to reach their subscribers!

And that hasn't happened.  The Comcast-Netflix dispute is the closest thing and that was settled without need of government intervention.  You've got a solution in search of a problem.

As a Netflix subscriber, I have been directly harmed by that settlement because Netflix can't afford to buy rights to as much content as it would otherwise.

I am also a Comcast customer, but I haven't benefited from that side of the settlement because Comcast merely extracted the revenue as profit for itself.

Title II is only necessary if you're unwilling to seek new legislation for net neutrality.

Thank you for conceding the point that, in the absence of new legislation (which, politically speaking, will not exist), Title II is necessary for net neutrality.

Forbearance isn't an agency "choice" nor is it automatic.  It requires an individualized petition from each entity that seeks a forbearance and specific findings of fact for each forbearance.  Assuming each petition for any proposed new entrant is granted, any party, including its competitors, can petition the FCC to overturn the forbearance, then appeal a Circuit Court.  The FCC may wish to forbear those sections, but it isn't discretionary in the manner you describe.   

Quote from: https://www.fcc.gov/encyclopedia/Forbearance
If the Commission fails to act on a forbearance petition within one year (extended by three months, if necessary), the petition is "deemed granted" by operation of law.

That looks pretty automatic to me -- all the FCC has to do is let ISPs file petitions against the rules they don't like, then ignore them.

Comcast / Netflix wasn't about Comcast striking a deal with Hulu to slow down Netflix (to use Jack's example model). It was about Comcast extracting revenue from Netflix because of the traffic load Netflix was putting on Comcast's network. Debate the merits of either side's case there, but it wasn't treating Company B traffic differently because of a deal made with Company A.

You're right that it wasn't Comcast striking a deal with Hulu. It was about Comcast-the-ISP striking a deal with Comcast-the-cable-TV-company in order to harm Comcast-the-cable-TV-company's competitor, Netflix.
Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: angryuser on November 13, 2014, 05:14 pm
If anyone missed Ted Cruze a day or so ago when he was being very Ted Cruze (read: ignorantly stupid, or dangerously disingenuous) on this topic,

he tweeted: ""Net Neutrality" is Obamacare for the Internet; the Internet should not operate at the speed of government."

even his supporters lit him up.
http://samuel-warde.com/2014/11/facebook-responses-ted-cruz-post-will-make-day/ (http://samuel-warde.com/2014/11/facebook-responses-ted-cruz-post-will-make-day/)

kinda refreshing.
Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: angryuser on November 13, 2014, 05:16 pm
And it's shit like that that is confusing the issue. Obama is for it, so the talk-radio mouthbreathers eat up the line that they are supposed to be against it.  :diaf:
Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: Cap'n Ken on November 13, 2014, 05:23 pm
And it's shit like that that is confusing the issue. Obama is for it, so the talk-radio mouthbreathers eat up the line that they are supposed to be against it.  :diaf:

And Democrats think Obama's plan is awesome without thinking through the issues.

We need what we always lack - reasoned discussion not driven by political sides. Throw in the fact that everybody rightfully hates ISPs and any solution that sounds bad to them starts to seem like a great idea whether or not it is.
Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: angryuser on November 13, 2014, 05:31 pm
And it's shit like that that is confusing the issue. Obama is for it, so the talk-radio mouthbreathers eat up the line that they are supposed to be against it.  :diaf:

And Democrats think Obama's plan is awesome without thinking through the issues.

We need what we always lack - reasoned discussion not driven by political sides. Throw in the fact that everybody rightfully hates ISPs and any solution that sounds bad to them starts to seem like a great idea whether or not it is.

Everyone that knew enough about the topic to have a valid opinion about it (that isn't on a Comcast, or related, payroll) has been for it for so much time before Obama finally decided enough elections were out of the way and he could finally voice his opinion. It's not a goddamn left/right issue. Every politician that has tried to trump it up as such should be pulled out into a street and shot.
Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: dsnation on November 13, 2014, 05:39 pm

No, this is a change in regulation. For all you know, being classified as Title I might cost more than being classified as Title II. For all you know, being reclassified as Title II might make ISPs more innovative than they were under Title I.
Except 80 years of Title II regulation have shown that it creates sclerotic and entrenched businesses that do not innovate, invest, or improve while lightly regulated (or *gasp* unregulated) industry is forced to constantly improve.  I noticed you didn't identify any new entrants into a Title II regulated market.  It's okay, I couldn't find any in the last 20 years either.  Lots of spinoffs, mergers, joint ventures, etc., but no new players.



As a Netflix subscriber, I have been directly harmed by that settlement because Netflix can't afford to buy rights to as much content as it would otherwise.

I am also a Comcast customer, but I haven't benefited from that side of the settlement because Comcast merely extracted the revenue as profit for itself.

Netflix and Comcast made a business decision to establish an interconnection agreement because of the heavy traffic that Netflix forced onto Comcast's servers.  You haven't been harmed in any way.  You're subscription with both entities entitles you to the offerings that they provide, not the theoretically best offerings available.  Don't like it?  Don't subscribe.  You are not forced to subscribe to either service.

Title II is only necessary if you're unwilling to seek new legislation for net neutrality.

Thank you for conceding the point that, in the absence of new legislation (which, politically speaking, will not exist), Title II is necessary for net neutrality.

I think you're confused by the word "concede." Title II is unnecessary.  Hell, net neutrality legislation is, at this point, unnecessary.  Should it become necessary, the proper entity to enact it is Congress. 

Forbearance isn't an agency "choice" nor is it automatic.  It requires an individualized petition from each entity that seeks a forbearance and specific findings of fact for each forbearance.  Assuming each petition for any proposed new entrant is granted, any party, including its competitors, can petition the FCC to overturn the forbearance, then appeal a Circuit Court.  The FCC may wish to forbear those sections, but it isn't discretionary in the manner you describe.   

Quote from: https://www.fcc.gov/encyclopedia/Forbearance
If the Commission fails to act on a forbearance petition within one year (extended by three months, if necessary), the petition is "deemed granted" by operation of law.

That looks pretty automatic to me -- all the FCC has to do is let ISPs file petitions against the rules they don't like, then ignore them.

Again, not the way it works.  See, we have laws and rules that control our government.  An agency can't simply ignore a petition any more than it can simply change it's mind about something decades after it's decided it.  If you really want to wade into how forbearance petitions work, read the manual here - https://apps.fcc.gov/edocs_public/attachmatch/FCC-09-56A1.pdf (https://apps.fcc.gov/edocs_public/attachmatch/FCC-09-56A1.pdf)  It's a public process that any interested party, you included, can decide to get in on through the notice and comment period.  In any event, you are now subjecting anyone who wishes to enter into a market or have relief from the mandatory rate setting provisions of Title II to wait a full year after submitting a complete petition.  Oh, and after it's granted, any interested party can file for a Declaratory Ruling overturning the forbearance. 

The only winners should ISPs become subject to Title II are the lawyers. I suppose I should thank you for your advocacy here on behalf of my profession. 
Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: dsnation on November 13, 2014, 05:42 pm
And it's shit like that that is confusing the issue. Obama is for it, so the talk-radio mouthbreathers eat up the line that they are supposed to be against it.  :diaf:

And Democrats think Obama's plan is awesome without thinking through the issues.

We need what we always lack - reasoned discussion not driven by political sides. Throw in the fact that everybody rightfully hates ISPs and any solution that sounds bad to them starts to seem like a great idea whether or not it is.

I really suspect the ISPs want this.  If they're subject to Title II, they jack up costs for competitors while securing themselves a profit-making rate.  They turn themselves into the Baby Bells instead of being subject to creative destruction of the market.
Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: Jack on November 13, 2014, 05:46 pm
And it's shit like that that is confusing the issue. Obama is for it, so the talk-radio mouthbreathers eat up the line that they are supposed to be against it.  :diaf:

And Democrats think Obama's plan is awesome without thinking through the issues.

We need what we always lack - reasoned discussion not driven by political sides. Throw in the fact that everybody rightfully hates ISPs and any solution that sounds bad to them starts to seem like a great idea whether or not it is.

Everyone that knew enough about the topic to have a valid opinion about it (that isn't on a Comcast, or related, payroll) has been for it for so much time before Obama finally decided enough elections were out of the way and he could finally voice his opinion. It's not a goddamn left/right issue. Every politician that has tried to trump it up as such should be pulled out into a street and shot.

Quoted for truth.

Just to be clear: I am not a Democrat and I thought net neutrality was awesome long before that asswipe of a President finally deigned to listen to the mountain of grass-roots activism going on about it.

I really suspect the ISPs want this.  If they're subject to Title II, they jack up costs for competitors while securing themselves a profit-making rate.  They turn themselves into the Baby Bells instead of being subject to creative destruction of the market.

Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: angryuser on November 13, 2014, 06:04 pm
Yes, wired services require local authorization. I'd love to see those rules loosened up, but there are practical considerations. Federal regulation is hardly a move in the "market" direction there.

You keep trying to pretend that the federal regulation being discussed is somehow "new." It isn't. Wired telecommunications have always been regulated. In fact, ISPs should always have been regulated as Title II Common Carriers, because that's what they truly are. All that's going on here is fixing that mistake, and your "new regulation" boogeyman does not actually exist.

Not to mention, as a website owner, you should agree! Don't you realize that without net neutrality, (for example) NextDoor.com could strike a deal with Comcast to block EAVBuzz?

If there's a regulatory anomaly that has prevented ISPs from being regulated as utilities ... then I'm happy that's how it worked out. And whatever "should" have been the case, we're looking at an industry that's 20 years old and exists as it does now. So putting it into a regulatory regime now would be new and different. You're leaning on a theoretical regulatory history that doesn't exist to argue that reality is something different than it is.

And I'm really curious why - given that net neutrality isn't in place - Comcast hasn't struck a deal with NextDoor.com and blocked EAVBuzz.

Well, they did throttle Netflix until Netflix caved and paid the extortion fee. Maybe you're on the list and they just haven't worked their way down to you yet.

Maybe if my planned EAVideo service really takes off ..

Comcast / Netflix wasn't about Comcast striking a deal with Hulu to slow down Netflix (to use Jack's example model). It was about Comcast extracting revenue from Netflix because of the traffic load Netflix was putting on Comcast's network. Debate the merits of either side's case there, but it wasn't treating Company B traffic differently because of a deal made with Company A.


...yet.
and arguably, they actually did. Their OnDemand services weren't artificially throttled until they paid themselves more. If you don't have the bandwidth to give consumers what you sold them, either charge more and build out the capacity or stop promising it. Don't throttle the traffic your customers already paid for while you try to double-dip.
Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: Cap'n Ken on November 13, 2014, 06:17 pm
Yes, wired services require local authorization. I'd love to see those rules loosened up, but there are practical considerations. Federal regulation is hardly a move in the "market" direction there.

You keep trying to pretend that the federal regulation being discussed is somehow "new." It isn't. Wired telecommunications have always been regulated. In fact, ISPs should always have been regulated as Title II Common Carriers, because that's what they truly are. All that's going on here is fixing that mistake, and your "new regulation" boogeyman does not actually exist.

Not to mention, as a website owner, you should agree! Don't you realize that without net neutrality, (for example) NextDoor.com could strike a deal with Comcast to block EAVBuzz?

If there's a regulatory anomaly that has prevented ISPs from being regulated as utilities ... then I'm happy that's how it worked out. And whatever "should" have been the case, we're looking at an industry that's 20 years old and exists as it does now. So putting it into a regulatory regime now would be new and different. You're leaning on a theoretical regulatory history that doesn't exist to argue that reality is something different than it is.

And I'm really curious why - given that net neutrality isn't in place - Comcast hasn't struck a deal with NextDoor.com and blocked EAVBuzz.

Well, they did throttle Netflix until Netflix caved and paid the extortion fee. Maybe you're on the list and they just haven't worked their way down to you yet.

Maybe if my planned EAVideo service really takes off ..

Comcast / Netflix wasn't about Comcast striking a deal with Hulu to slow down Netflix (to use Jack's example model). It was about Comcast extracting revenue from Netflix because of the traffic load Netflix was putting on Comcast's network. Debate the merits of either side's case there, but it wasn't treating Company B traffic differently because of a deal made with Company A.


...yet.
and arguably, they actually did. Their OnDemand services weren't artificially throttled until they paid themselves more. If you don't have the bandwidth to give consumers what you sold them, either charge more and build out the capacity or stop promising it. Don't throttle the traffic your customers already paid for while you try to double-dip.

Not really quite the same argument - but it's splitting hairs. Now the question of how a company that sells you both video content and ISP access that could replace the video content they sell you behaves is an interesting one. I'm actually pretty surprised that Netflix and the like (not to mention torrents) have come to such prominence in that environment without more interference than we've seen.
Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: katherine77 on November 24, 2014, 05:17 pm
Here's a look at what Austin customers will pay for Google Fiber. Sounds pretty reasonable to me.

http://t.co/QBhiZmiW4X (http://t.co/QBhiZmiW4X)

Quote
Customers who opt for the service, which features download speeds of 5 Mbps and upload speeds of 1 Mbps, will pay a one-time construction fee of $300, Google executives said Monday afternoon. After that, there will be no monthly service charge.

The construction fee can be paid all at once or spread out over 12 months.

The much faster 1-gigabit Google Fiber service will cost $70 per month, the Internet giant said, while a combo package with 1-gigabit Internet and approximately 150 cable TV networks will run $130 per month.
Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: J. Grouchy on December 23, 2014, 10:13 am
Google Fiber delays move into Atlanta area (http://www.11alive.com/story/tech/2014/12/19/google-fiber-delayed-atlanta/20633487/)

Not terribly informative...though it does sound like it'll actually happen, only a little further down the road than hoped.
Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: Jack on December 23, 2014, 06:21 pm
Quote from: article
Google said in February it was considering rolling out Google Fiber service to Avondale Estates, Brookhaven, College Park, Decatur, East Point, Hapeville, Sandy Springs and Smyrna.

I'm going to be really pissed if somehow that list is literal, and they skip over the City of Atlanta itself.
Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: jsvh on December 24, 2014, 11:28 am
Quote from: article
Google said in February it was considering rolling out Google Fiber service to Avondale Estates, Brookhaven, College Park, Decatur, East Point, Hapeville, Sandy Springs and Smyrna.

I'm going to be really pissed if somehow that list is literal, and they skip over the City of Atlanta itself.

CoA is included. They have been working with the city already: http://www.atlantaga.gov/index.aspx?page=672&recordid=2651 (http://www.atlantaga.gov/index.aspx?page=672&recordid=2651)
Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: Dave2PVD on December 24, 2014, 04:01 pm
Perhaps a coincidence, but both Cherokee and Grant had big fat fiber bundles run in the last 4 months. The Grant St one runs on the HV poles from the Beltline to somewhere North. I heard near Grady HS.

Both were reportedly 'not Google' according to the install crews. My bet is they are part of a leased ring around the city.
Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: JBB on December 24, 2014, 09:03 pm
They also ran lines under ground along a few streets.
Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: Cap'n Ken on December 24, 2014, 09:13 pm
They also ran lines under ground along a few streets.

"Tower Cloud" as seen on that marker appears to be a backhaul provider for wireless carriers.

http://www.fiercetelecom.com/story/tower-cloud-ups-atlanta-network-10g/2013-03-13 (http://www.fiercetelecom.com/story/tower-cloud-ups-atlanta-network-10g/2013-03-13)
Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: Cap'n Ken on January 26, 2015, 08:38 pm
http://www.decaturmetro.com/2015/01/26/google-sets-up-atlanta-press-conference-for-tomorrow/ (http://www.decaturmetro.com/2015/01/26/google-sets-up-atlanta-press-conference-for-tomorrow/)

(http://media.giphy.com/media/4KxeicCUTvhrW/giphy.gif)
Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: jsvh on January 26, 2015, 09:24 pm
Yes Please!!

WSJ is claiming Atlanta is one of 4 of 8 metros under consideration that will get the service: http://www.wsj.com/articles/google-to-announce-fiber-expansion-in-four-cities-1422322192 (http://www.wsj.com/articles/google-to-announce-fiber-expansion-in-four-cities-1422322192)
Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: hotlegshooligan on March 05, 2015, 04:24 pm
Job posting for Google Fiber Sales managers in Atlanta.

https://www.linkedin.com/jobs2/view/29460900?trk=jobs_home_click_jymbii&refId=fbd0b56b-b261-43aa-8bea-8f99583be0d3 (https://www.linkedin.com/jobs2/view/29460900?trk=jobs_home_click_jymbii&refId=fbd0b56b-b261-43aa-8bea-8f99583be0d3)

Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: Cap'n Ken on March 05, 2015, 05:01 pm
Job posting for Google Fiber Sales managers in Atlanta.

https://www.linkedin.com/jobs2/view/29460900?trk=jobs_home_click_jymbii&refId=fbd0b56b-b261-43aa-8bea-8f99583be0d3 (https://www.linkedin.com/jobs2/view/29460900?trk=jobs_home_click_jymbii&refId=fbd0b56b-b261-43aa-8bea-8f99583be0d3)

Do they even need salesmen? Just gimme!

Interesting that the job description specifically mentions selling to commercial building owners. Google has said pretty often that this is a residential service and they aren't targeting business use.
Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: Nugget1977 on March 05, 2015, 05:54 pm
Job posting for Google Fiber Sales managers in Atlanta.

https://www.linkedin.com/jobs2/view/29460900?trk=jobs_home_click_jymbii&refId=fbd0b56b-b261-43aa-8bea-8f99583be0d3 (https://www.linkedin.com/jobs2/view/29460900?trk=jobs_home_click_jymbii&refId=fbd0b56b-b261-43aa-8bea-8f99583be0d3)

Do they even need salesmen? Just gimme!

Interesting that the job description specifically mentions selling to commercial building owners. Google has said pretty often that this is a residential service and they aren't targeting business use.

Yeah, but in a market like ours that has notoriously bad ISP options, they'd be foolish not to try to earn their business.  I have several clients pay $500-$1200/month for bonded T1s because there isn't ATT/Windstream/charter fiber available in their area.  They'd probably be more than willing to shell out some money for a 'business class' fiber connection that can increase their capacity by a factor of 50 or more.
Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: cybrhippy on April 02, 2015, 11:56 am
Wasn't sure to start a new thread or just add information to this one, But it looks like Comcast is going to be rolling out 2Mbps service next month.

http://arstechnica.com/information-technology/2015/04/comcast-doubles-google-fiber-with-2gbps-symmetrical-fiber-service/#p3 (http://arstechnica.com/information-technology/2015/04/comcast-doubles-google-fiber-with-2gbps-symmetrical-fiber-service/#p3)

Not endorsing this, but could be an option for people if they can't get Google Fibre. Since I am "just outside" Atlanta City limits I will be keeping an eye on this.
Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: rawr on April 02, 2015, 12:01 pm
Wasn't sure to start a new thread or just add information to this one, But it looks like Comcast is going to be rolling out 2Mbps service next month.

http://arstechnica.com/information-technology/2015/04/comcast-doubles-google-fiber-with-2gbps-symmetrical-fiber-service/#p3 (http://arstechnica.com/information-technology/2015/04/comcast-doubles-google-fiber-with-2gbps-symmetrical-fiber-service/#p3)

Not endorsing this, but could be an option for people if they can't get Google Fibre. Since I am "just outside" Atlanta City limits I will be keeping an eye on this.

Just read that article too.  I'll be interested in what their pricing is, because our package is expensive already.
Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: Nate (NFN) on April 02, 2015, 12:12 pm
Wasn't sure to start a new thread or just add information to this one, But it looks like Comcast is going to be rolling out 2Mbps service next month.

http://arstechnica.com/information-technology/2015/04/comcast-doubles-google-fiber-with-2gbps-symmetrical-fiber-service/#p3 (http://arstechnica.com/information-technology/2015/04/comcast-doubles-google-fiber-with-2gbps-symmetrical-fiber-service/#p3)

Not endorsing this, but could be an option for people if they can't get Google Fibre. Since I am "just outside" Atlanta City limits I will be keeping an eye on this.

2gpbs
Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: Cap'n Ken on April 02, 2015, 12:38 pm
Yeah, we'll see where and when Comcast offers that. They say you have to be near their existing fiber infrastructure ... not sure what that means but it likely means you're near some big commercial developments that use their heavy data services.
Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: angryuser on April 02, 2015, 01:59 pm
Wasn't sure to start a new thread or just add information to this one, But it looks like Comcast is going to be rolling out 2Mbps service next month.

http://arstechnica.com/information-technology/2015/04/comcast-doubles-google-fiber-with-2gbps-symmetrical-fiber-service/#p3 (http://arstechnica.com/information-technology/2015/04/comcast-doubles-google-fiber-with-2gbps-symmetrical-fiber-service/#p3)

Not endorsing this, but could be an option for people if they can't get Google Fibre. Since I am "just outside" Atlanta City limits I will be keeping an eye on this.

Just read that article too.  I'll be interested in what their pricing is, because our package is expensive already.

"And all with a 250GB data cap!"
(http://www.clockwatching.net/~shadow/images/icons/laugh.gif)




 :diaf:
Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: Jack on April 02, 2015, 06:53 pm
If that 2Gbps service actually becomes available in this neighborhood, for a reasonable price, before Google Fiber does, I'll eat my hat.
Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: meltco on April 04, 2015, 02:18 pm
You can sign up to be notified when Google fiber is available at your address here: https://fiber.google.com/other/

If you're interested in getting Google fiber, the more people in your neighborhood who sign up the better, as I'm sure they'll use this data to determine where interest is highest.
Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: meltco on April 13, 2015, 11:21 am
AT&T just announced they're getting into the gigabit game: http://www.ajc.com/news/business/att-says-will-offer-atlanta-super-fast-internet/nksPy/ (http://www.ajc.com/news/business/att-says-will-offer-atlanta-super-fast-internet/nksPy/)

 ***
Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: T@Nk on April 13, 2015, 11:27 am
Quote
Comcast, the metro area’s dominant cable TV provider, recently announced local plans for two gigabit-per-second speeds — twice as fast as that pledged by either Google or AT&T locally. Comcast is expected to roll out its service next month.

Can't wait to see how at&t and comcrap try to entice folks to stay with them. Well? I'm waiting! :handjob: :no:
Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: Cap'n Ken on April 13, 2015, 11:55 am
Quote
Comcast, the metro area’s dominant cable TV provider, recently announced local plans for two gigabit-per-second speeds — twice as fast as that pledged by either Google or AT&T locally. Comcast is expected to roll out its service next month.

Can't wait to see how at&t and comcrap try to entice folks to stay with them. Well? I'm waiting! :handjob: :no:

AT&T is likely in the best position to actually roll out Gigabit - at least within their U-Verse service area. They're way ahead of Google in infrastructure.
Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: Folsom on April 13, 2015, 09:59 pm
I wonder if they will be inspecting all the traffic like in Austin.  Gigapower is $70/month or $100/month without them inspecting every packet and selling the data.
Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: angryuser on April 23, 2015, 04:34 pm
This seems to be the best existing thread for this...

Hot damn.
Comcast Is Said to End $45 Billion Bid for Time Warner Cable
http://www.nytimes.com/2015/04/24/business/media/comcast-time-warner-cable-merger.html?_r=0 (http://www.nytimes.com/2015/04/24/business/media/comcast-time-warner-cable-merger.html?_r=0)

 :drink:
Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: JBB on April 23, 2015, 06:05 pm
This seems to be the best existing thread for this...

Hot damn.
Comcast Is Said to End $45 Billion Bid for Time Warner Cable
http://www.nytimes.com/2015/04/24/business/media/comcast-time-warner-cable-merger.html?_r=0 (http://www.nytimes.com/2015/04/24/business/media/comcast-time-warner-cable-merger.html?_r=0)

 :drink:
I prefer all Comcast, at&t, and other "service providers" have their own threads. When I see activity on this thread, I want it to contain information directly related to a fiber line being connected to my house.
Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: angryuser on April 23, 2015, 07:53 pm
This seems to be the best existing thread for this...

Hot damn.
Comcast Is Said to End $45 Billion Bid for Time Warner Cable
http://www.nytimes.com/2015/04/24/business/media/comcast-time-warner-cable-merger.html?_r=0 (http://www.nytimes.com/2015/04/24/business/media/comcast-time-warner-cable-merger.html?_r=0)

 :drink:
I prefer all Comcast, at&t, and other "service providers" have their own threads. When I see activity on this thread, I want it to contain information directly related to a fiber line being connected to my house.

But that would make this a very lonely thread.  :D
Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: Cap'n Ken on May 01, 2015, 03:52 pm
This seems to be the best existing thread for this...

Hot damn.
Comcast Is Said to End $45 Billion Bid for Time Warner Cable
http://www.nytimes.com/2015/04/24/business/media/comcast-time-warner-cable-merger.html?_r=0 (http://www.nytimes.com/2015/04/24/business/media/comcast-time-warner-cable-merger.html?_r=0)

 :drink:
I prefer all Comcast, at&t, and other "service providers" have their own threads. When I see activity on this thread, I want it to contain information directly related to a fiber line being connected to my house.

I think this qualifies ...

So some AT&T guys have been out by my house the past couple of days, and I chatted them up yesterday. Most useful tidbit - you can recognize their new fiber lines because they have little orange "tags" (more like plastic collars over the line - maybe 4-6 inches long typically near a pole). Extrapolated fact from now constantly looking overhead as I drive around - something else needs to happen after the fiber is run before their "Giga" service is available. There's actually a good bit of fiber run around here already, but I haven't found an address where I see the fiber that says Giga is available. But what seems clear is that unless and until you see an orange-tagged line in front of your house, Giga won't be available anytime soon from them.

It does seem, though, that from a fiber-laying perspective they've got a lead on The Googles.
Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: vigodas-pants on June 25, 2015, 02:58 pm
http://www.reddit.com/r/Atlanta/comments/3b3jgr/just_got_this_via_email_about_google_fiber/ (http://www.reddit.com/r/Atlanta/comments/3b3jgr/just_got_this_via_email_about_google_fiber/)
Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: J. Grouchy on June 25, 2015, 03:01 pm
http://www.reddit.com/r/Atlanta/comments/3b3jgr/just_got_this_via_email_about_google_fiber/ (http://www.reddit.com/r/Atlanta/comments/3b3jgr/just_got_this_via_email_about_google_fiber/)

I got that too...though it doesn't really seem like news to me.  More like a "we're working on it...don't get your panties in a wad" message.
Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: Cap'n Ken on June 25, 2015, 03:21 pm
http://www.reddit.com/r/Atlanta/comments/3b3jgr/just_got_this_via_email_about_google_fiber/ (http://www.reddit.com/r/Atlanta/comments/3b3jgr/just_got_this_via_email_about_google_fiber/)

I got that too...though it doesn't really seem like news to me.  More like a "we're working on it...don't get your panties in a wad" message.

Yep, exactly.
Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: vigodas-pants on June 25, 2015, 05:23 pm
Indeed.  Just passing along the "news."
Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: Maru32 on June 26, 2015, 02:46 pm
http://wabe.org/post/google-fiber-construction-begins-midtown-atlanta (http://wabe.org/post/google-fiber-construction-begins-midtown-atlanta)

"Six months after announcing that Google Fiber was coming to Atlanta, construction has begun in Midtown.

Crews are laying down cables underground and building 23 fiber huts to store equipment in the metro area.

Google's Fabiola Charles Stokes said she's not sure how long construction will last, but she hopes to keep residents updated.  "It's a very huge project, literally laying in enough fiber-optic cable to stretch from Atlanta to Iceland," Stokes said.

That's 3,400 miles.

"We're actually really excited to be able to be building our own fiber network from scratch," Stokes said. "That's been one of the key tenets of the Google Fiber rollout."

She said pricing will be comparable to other Google Fiber cities. In Austin, Texas, gigabit Internet service starts at $70 a month.

But there will be competition. In Atlanta, Comcast and AT&T already offer gigabit Internet service.

Google Fiber will also be available in Avondale Estates, Brookhaven, College Park, East Point, Decatur, Hapeville, Sandy Springs and Smyrna. "
Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: barbecuesteve on June 26, 2015, 09:56 pm
What? Comcast offers gigabit? I can't imagine what that costs.
Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: JBB on June 26, 2015, 10:30 pm
Iceland? I guess that's far away... Has anyone ever driven from Atlanta to Iceland? Why not say Atlanta to NYC and back twice?
Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: J. Grouchy on June 27, 2015, 10:33 am
Iceland? I guess that's far away... Has anyone ever driven from Atlanta to Iceland? Why not say Atlanta to NYC and back twice?

I dunno...'cause most people can look at a map?   :(~
Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: vigodas-pants on June 27, 2015, 01:07 pm
Iceland? I guess that's far away... Has anyone ever driven from Atlanta to Iceland? Why not say Atlanta to NYC and back twice?

Because Iceland sounds very far away.
Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: Andreas on June 27, 2015, 05:32 pm
Iceland? I guess that's far away... Has anyone ever driven from Atlanta to Iceland? Why not say Atlanta to NYC and back twice?

Most people don't know any geography.  Might as well say Iceland instead of NYC.
Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: mongo on July 14, 2015, 01:35 pm
The distance between Atlanta to Reykjavik, Iceland is approximately the same as it is from Key West to Seattle.  So Basically as far as you can drive and still remain within the lower 48 Continental United States. That is pretty far...

Iceland? I guess that's far away... Has anyone ever driven from Atlanta to Iceland? Why not say Atlanta to NYC and back twice?

Most people don't know any geography.  Might as well say Iceland instead of NYC.
Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: eremine on July 23, 2015, 10:03 am
This seems to be the best existing thread for this...

Hot damn.
Comcast Is Said to End $45 Billion Bid for Time Warner Cable
http://www.nytimes.com/2015/04/24/business/media/comcast-time-warner-cable-merger.html?_r=0 (http://www.nytimes.com/2015/04/24/business/media/comcast-time-warner-cable-merger.html?_r=0)

 :drink:
I prefer all Comcast, at&t, and other "service providers" have their own threads. When I see activity on this thread, I want it to contain information directly related to a fiber line being connected to my house.

I think this qualifies ...

So some AT&T guys have been out by my house the past couple of days, and I chatted them up yesterday. Most useful tidbit - you can recognize their new fiber lines because they have little orange "tags" (more like plastic collars over the line - maybe 4-6 inches long typically near a pole). Extrapolated fact from now constantly looking overhead as I drive around - something else needs to happen after the fiber is run before their "Giga" service is available. There's actually a good bit of fiber run around here already, but I haven't found an address where I see the fiber that says Giga is available. But what seems clear is that unless and until you see an orange-tagged line in front of your house, Giga won't be available anytime soon from them.

It does seem, though, that from a fiber-laying perspective they've got a lead on The Googles.

So AT&T says the Giga service is available at our address. Has anyone in the neighborhood signed up for this yet?
Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: Cap'n Ken on July 23, 2015, 12:29 pm
This seems to be the best existing thread for this...

Hot damn.
Comcast Is Said to End $45 Billion Bid for Time Warner Cable
http://www.nytimes.com/2015/04/24/business/media/comcast-time-warner-cable-merger.html?_r=0 (http://www.nytimes.com/2015/04/24/business/media/comcast-time-warner-cable-merger.html?_r=0)

 :drink:
I prefer all Comcast, at&t, and other "service providers" have their own threads. When I see activity on this thread, I want it to contain information directly related to a fiber line being connected to my house.

I think this qualifies ...

So some AT&T guys have been out by my house the past couple of days, and I chatted them up yesterday. Most useful tidbit - you can recognize their new fiber lines because they have little orange "tags" (more like plastic collars over the line - maybe 4-6 inches long typically near a pole). Extrapolated fact from now constantly looking overhead as I drive around - something else needs to happen after the fiber is run before their "Giga" service is available. There's actually a good bit of fiber run around here already, but I haven't found an address where I see the fiber that says Giga is available. But what seems clear is that unless and until you see an orange-tagged line in front of your house, Giga won't be available anytime soon from them.

It does seem, though, that from a fiber-laying perspective they've got a lead on The Googles.

So AT&T says the Giga service is available at our address. Has anyone in the neighborhood signed up for this yet?

Do it! And report back, please.

I learned (by chatting with an AT&T rep about possibly canceling service for faster Comcast) that 75Mbps UVerse is available at my place now (was 45Mbps max before), and through some convoluted set of "special offers" and whatnot I'll end up with it for $1 more than I had been paying for TV/Internet at 45Mbps before. But that's still just unacceptably slow with the promise of gigabit out there now.
Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: J. Grouchy on July 24, 2015, 03:10 pm
http://gizmodo.com/it-s-on-at-t-and-directv-just-got-the-ok-to-merge-1720025559 (http://gizmodo.com/it-s-on-at-t-and-directv-just-got-the-ok-to-merge-1720025559)


COME ON, GOOGLE FIBER!
Can't happen soon enough.

Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: Nate (NFN) on July 25, 2015, 12:23 pm
Signed up for gigapower with ATT to be installed 8/3. Sorry Google. If you are done next year I will switch.
Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: Cap'n Ken on July 25, 2015, 01:10 pm
Signed up for gigapower with ATT to be installed 8/3. Sorry Google. If you are done next year I will switch.

Fantastic that they are actually rolling this out. I look forward to the reviews and SpeedTest screen grabs.
Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: Jack on July 25, 2015, 02:31 pm
Signed up for gigapower with ATT to be installed 8/3. Sorry Google. If you are done next year I will switch.

Fantastic that they are actually rolling this out. I look forward to the reviews and SpeedTest screen grabs.

Don't thank AT&T, thank Google. Because we all know that AT&T wouldn't have done a damn thing if it weren't for the threat of Google's competition!

Until Google gets here, I will continue to have the absolute cheapest Internet possible, just because the fuckers at AT&T and Comcast don't deserve one damn cent more of my money!  >:O
Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: Cap'n Ken on July 25, 2015, 03:30 pm
Signed up for gigapower with ATT to be installed 8/3. Sorry Google. If you are done next year I will switch.

Fantastic that they are actually rolling this out. I look forward to the reviews and SpeedTest screen grabs.

Don't thank AT&T, thank Google. Because we all know that AT&T wouldn't have done a damn thing if it weren't for the threat of Google's competition!

Until Google gets here, I will continue to have the absolute cheapest Internet possible, just because the fuckers at AT&T and Comcast don't deserve one damn cent more of my money!  >:O

a) I didn't "thank" AT&T. I said it's fantastic that they are actually rolling this out.

b) Suit yourself re: having shitty Internet service as a protest.
Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: angryuser on July 25, 2015, 07:10 pm
Signed up for gigapower with ATT to be installed 8/3. Sorry Google. If you are done next year I will switch.

how much $ and how fast have they promised you?
Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: Folsom on July 26, 2015, 02:39 pm
Signed up for gigapower with ATT to be installed 8/3. Sorry Google. If you are done next year I will switch.

how much $ and how fast have they promised you?

Also, do you have the option for AT&T to not inspect every packet?  In other markets they charge an extra $30 for that.
Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: eremine on July 26, 2015, 02:56 pm
Signed up for gigapower with ATT to be installed 8/3. Sorry Google. If you are done next year I will switch.

how much $ and how fast have they promised you?

Also, do you have the option for AT&T to not inspect every packet?  In other markets they charge an extra $30 for that.

I submitted an order on Thursday but so far I have only gotten an "order delayed" with no explanation email.  For just internet the price is $90/month for 100 mpbs or $120/month for 1gbps.  $30 a month more a month if you don't agree to their "Internet Preferences" which is the targeted advertising based on your search history. 1 year contract at this price, installation fee waived.
Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: J. Grouchy on July 26, 2015, 03:01 pm
Signed up for gigapower with ATT to be installed 8/3. Sorry Google. If you are done next year I will switch.

how much $ and how fast have they promised you?

Also, do you have the option for AT&T to not inspect every packet?  In other markets they charge an extra $30 for that.

I submitted an order on Thursday but so far I have only gotten an "order delayed" with no explanation email.  For just internet the price is $90/month for 100 mpbs or $120/month for 1gbps.  $30 a month more a month if you don't agree to their "Internet Preferences" which is the targeted advertising based on your search history. 1 year contract at this price, installation fee waived.

$30 more per month for ten times the speed?
Not that it should really be directly proportional, but it seems like the 100 mbps ought to be significantly less than the gig.
Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: Cap'n Ken on August 06, 2015, 07:56 am
There's been at least one successful AT&T gigabit install (not me) in the neighborhood.

Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: JBB on August 06, 2015, 08:17 am
There's been at least one successful AT&T gigabit install (not me) in the neighborhood.
what legal and within-the-TOS things can this customer do that folks with regular broadband cannot?
Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: angryuser on August 06, 2015, 09:15 am
There's been at least one successful AT&T gigabit install (not me) in the neighborhood.
what legal and within-the-TOS things can this customer do that folks with regular broadband cannot?

Destroy in online gaming with the low latency.
Surf porn. All of it. Right now.
 ;D
Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: J. Grouchy on August 06, 2015, 09:32 am
Who the hell cares?  If GF can supplant both my Comcast and DirecTV for equal or less money (entirely possible based on what I'm seeing of their rates in other cities), I'm all over it.  Even if I only got double the speed I'm getting now.

Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: J. Grouchy on August 10, 2015, 09:00 pm
Huge inside shakeup as Google creates 'Alphabet' umbrella company (http://www.androidcentral.com/google-now-subsidiary-newly-formed-company-alphabet?utm_medium=slider&utm_campaign=navigation&utm_source=ac)

Quote
As expected, Android, YouTube, apps, search and maps will remain under the Google subsidiary. However, businesses like Google Fiber, Nest, Google X and others will be managed as separate subsidiaries.
Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: T@Nk on August 12, 2015, 10:34 am
Just looked at my upgrade possibilities after Comcrap's announcement of $300/month 2gig service in Atlanta and saw the 'data cap' wording....

Quote
In all of our trial markets except Tucson, the data amount included with all XFINITY Internet tiers was increased from 250 GB to 300 GB per month. We offer additional gigabytes in increments/blocks of 50 GB for $10 each.

 :diaf:
Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: J. Grouchy on August 12, 2015, 11:38 am
Just looked at my upgrade possibilities after Comcrap's announcement of $300/month 2gig service in Atlanta and saw the 'data cap' wording....

Quote
In all of our trial markets except Tucson, the data amount included with all XFINITY Internet tiers was increased from 250 GB to 300 GB per month. We offer additional gigabytes in increments/blocks of 50 GB for $10 each.

 :diaf:

Speaking in terms of Netflix/Pandora/Dropcam style internet usage...what does 300 GB equate to?  We seem to be going all over the place...91GB in May to 254GB in June to 172GB in July.  I feel like our usage has stayed pretty consistent all summer, so I can't really figure out how it varies so much.
Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: barbecuesteve on August 12, 2015, 11:54 am
Expect 5GB/hr of streamed 1080p video. 720p, around 3GB/hr.

Also I have been running 400GB+ for the past several months and Comcast complains, throttles, but has not as of yet charged me.
Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: angryuser on August 12, 2015, 12:10 pm
It doesn't take a terribly large *amount of streaming tv, downloading F1 torrents and such to pop the 300GB cap. I think I just used up my third "courtesy" overage this year. Next one is supposed to cost me something like $10 for 10?, 50? extra gigs. We get around it by using comcast's shitty, commercial filled OnDemand to watch as much tv as possible (because, of course that doesn't count against your cap) and only move to streaming from stuff like amazon prime if it's not available on OnDemand.  :diaf:

*well, not by my standards, anyway.
Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: J. Grouchy on August 12, 2015, 01:10 pm
Yeah...so...c'mon GF!  As far as I know, no data caps.
Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: Jack on August 12, 2015, 07:39 pm
Just looked at my upgrade possibilities after Comcrap's announcement of $300/month 2gig service in Atlanta and saw the 'data cap' wording....

Quote
In all of our trial markets except Tucson, the data amount included with all XFINITY Internet tiers was increased from 250 GB to 300 GB per month. We offer additional gigabytes in increments/blocks of 50 GB for $10 each.

 :diaf:

I love it! You can max out that awesome 2 gbps connection for... wait for it... a whopping 20 minutes per month!

(A 2 gbps connection could theoretically download about 648 terabytes in a 30-day month. With Comcast's pricing plan, that would cost $129,840.)

If that 2Gbps service actually becomes available in this neighborhood, for a reasonable price, before Google Fiber does, I'll eat my hat.

My hat remains uneaten.
Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: Cap'n Ken on September 17, 2015, 11:09 am
AT&T is out today on Flat Shoals Avenue doing some measurement of utility lines. The workers told me it is, in fact, in preparation for running more Gigabit fiber here. So hopefully that happens soon. No idea how much more of the neighborhood they plan to cover this time, but seems clear we'll be getting it here on the Avenue.
Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: JBB on September 17, 2015, 11:19 am
http://www.decaturish.com/2015/09/metro-atlanta-home-to-new-google-fiber-training-facility/ (http://www.decaturish.com/2015/09/metro-atlanta-home-to-new-google-fiber-training-facility/)

Quote
Google built the program’s user interface from the ground up. Users will use a remote to operate a keyboard type interface on the TV screen. Users can watch or record up eight shows at a time and store up to 500 hours of programs. They can also store personal photos or videos on the storage device.

(http://img.tfd.com/cde/_WEBTVHP.GIF)
Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: eremine on October 19, 2015, 08:53 am
Update: AT&T is now charging $70 a month for 1 Gpbs (formerly $120) for just internet.
Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: J. Grouchy on October 19, 2015, 08:55 am
From a GG post I just read:

Quote
For anyone too lazy to read, or who is too lazy to go to the Google Fiber page and sign up for updates, or even too lazy to fill out the form to get a free shirt recently, please know those are just some of the tools Google uses to gauge interest in an area.  With that said, please keep that in mind when you read this one reply:

"They hook up where demand is highest first and get really specific about it. My brother lives about 5 blocks from me. He was in the second fiberhood hooked up, I didn't get service until nearly 2 years later."

If you haven't signed up for updates for your address, do it.
https://fiber.google.com/cities/atlanta/ (https://fiber.google.com/cities/atlanta/)


If you didn't sign up for your free t-shirt, do it:
https://fiber.google.com/cities/atlanta/tshirt/ (https://fiber.google.com/cities/atlanta/tshirt/)




Even if you're in love with your Comcast or AT&T connection, seriously, we need some competition and we would benefit highly from having them in SE ATL.  Don't expect your neighbors to do the legwork...


- J____

Quote
I've made a Reddit post on the Kansas City subreddit asking people there how long it took for their neighborhoods to receive Google Fiber service, from the time that infrastructure cable installation was started to actual start of service.  If any of you are interested, here's the link:



https://www.reddit.com/r/kansascity/comments/3p8tfl/how_long_did_google_fiber_take_to_install/ (https://www.reddit.com/r/kansascity/comments/3p8tfl/how_long_did_google_fiber_take_to_install/)
Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: Cap'n Ken on October 19, 2015, 09:38 am
Update: AT&T is now charging $70 a month for 1 Gpbs (formerly $120) for just internet.

That's awesome - but they need to get back out here and run more fiber. Or maybe they'll half-ass the deployment of that just like they did U-Verse. As long as they don't see Google trucks on the streets, maybe they don't care that much about building a footprint.
Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: hotlegshooligan on October 19, 2015, 10:05 am
ok I signed up for the shirt. it gave me this message and graphic



https://fiber.google.com/cities/atlanta/tshirt/thank-you/

it said "Keep in mind that these shirts are only available to residents in Atlanta, Avondale Estates, Brookhaven, College Park, Decatur, East Point, Hapeville, Sandy Springs and Smyrna and are limited to one per household.

We’ll get your t-shirt in the mail to you as soon as possible, but please allow up to 8 weeks for delivery. In the meantime, spread the word to your friends and family so we can send them one as well. "
Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: J. Grouchy on November 12, 2015, 08:21 pm
Got my t shirt today.
Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: Cap'n Ken on November 13, 2015, 06:59 am
Got my t shirt today.

Post a SpeedTest grab?

Oh, that's right, t-shirts aren't actually super-fast Internet access. But at least Google was able to deliver it to you.
Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: Bagel Snob on November 13, 2015, 09:59 am
Got my t shirt today.

Post a SpeedTest grab?

Oh, that's right, t-shirts aren't actually super-fast Internet access. But at least Google was able to deliver it to you.

Delivered via a drone or a self-driving car? Or do you get to pick?
Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: Cap'n Ken on March 06, 2016, 04:14 pm
I thought there was a more recently-updated Google Fiber thread around here, but I suppose not ...

In any case, there have been some groups of folks in orange vests wandering East Atlanta in the past week or so jotting stuff down about utility poles, measuring the height of wires and whatnot. I heard second-hand elsewhere that they were working for Google Fiber and today I confirmed that with this guy who was back visiting the poles near my house. Says it's for "permitting and stuff". I'd call that an encouraging sign; though who knows what it means in relation to a buildout timeline or anything.
Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: vigodas-pants on March 06, 2016, 05:48 pm
I thought there was a more recently-updated Google Fiber thread around here, but I suppose not ...

In any case, there have been some groups of folks in orange vests wandering East Atlanta in the past week or so jotting stuff down about utility poles, measuring the height of wires and whatnot. I heard second-hand elsewhere that they were working for Google Fiber and today I confirmed that with this guy who was back visiting the poles near my house. Says it's for "permitting and stuff". I'd call that an encouraging sign; though who knows what it means in relation to a buildout timeline or anything.

I saw them at Moreland & Ormewood this past week. Good news.
Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: JBB on March 06, 2016, 06:26 pm
Working on Sundays... Can't be a bad sign
Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: georgian on March 06, 2016, 09:58 pm
I stopped a worker doing the same thing at Ormewood and Confederate 2 weeks ago and he said "within the next two years".
Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: Nate (NFN) on March 07, 2016, 06:16 am
Funny I was told 6-12 months.
Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: J. Grouchy on March 07, 2016, 06:22 am
Funny I was told 6-12 months.

I stopped a worker doing the same thing at Ormewood and Confederate 2 weeks ago and he said "within the next two years".

I've heard the two year number from the point of it being announced.  As far the timing from now, I doubt any of the linemen really even know. 
Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: Jack on March 07, 2016, 08:13 pm
My coworker, who lives in an apartment off Monroe Drive, said he got a message saying his building had been wired for Google Fiber. Any apartment-dwellers near here get a similar message recently?
Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: JBB on March 07, 2016, 08:30 pm
My coworker, who lives in an apartment off Monroe Drive, said he got a message saying his building had been wired for Google Fiber. Any apartment-dwellers near here get a similar message recently?
https://fiber.google.com/cities/atlanta/apartments/neighborhoods/?neighborhood=all

This map shows a couple of complexes are live at this time, they've said for beta testing
Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: Bagel Snob on March 08, 2016, 06:59 am
"Broadway at East Atlanta" is now classiest apartment complex.
Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: Hollywood, Esq. on March 09, 2016, 06:59 pm
I stopped a worker doing the same thing at Ormewood and Confederate 2 weeks ago and he said "within the next two years".

They came and checked out my backyard a few days ago - was told "about a year".
Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: Cap'n Ken on March 10, 2016, 10:22 am
I stopped a worker doing the same thing at Ormewood and Confederate 2 weeks ago and he said "within the next two years".

They came and checked out my backyard a few days ago - was told "about a year".

Do y'all have lines running through your yard and down behind Milton/Ormewood or something? I saw the guys poking around up in the yard one closer to me - that's the only time I've seen them off the street.
Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: ohmylorelei on March 12, 2016, 01:59 pm
They were here last week too, on Loring in Ormewood.
Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: Gibbga on March 12, 2016, 05:10 pm
If it is the same guys in reflective vests, they were on Metropolitan & McPherson a couple of weeks ago too. I didn't speak with them tho.
Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: ratpack on March 15, 2016, 09:18 am
http://www.tonetoatl.com/2016/03/first-google-fiber-space-now-open-in.html (http://www.tonetoatl.com/2016/03/first-google-fiber-space-now-open-in.html)
Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: J. Grouchy on March 15, 2016, 09:21 am
http://www.tonetoatl.com/2016/03/first-google-fiber-space-now-open-in.html (http://www.tonetoatl.com/2016/03/first-google-fiber-space-now-open-in.html)

They almost make it sound like it's up and running.  Not funny.
Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: mongo on March 31, 2016, 11:57 am
They are setting up apartment complexes and condo building first, and then rolling it out from there, which makes sense.  According to the Google Fiber website, the new apartment building on Metropolitan that replaced the Gordon School is on the list of buildings that is scheduled to get Google Fiber service, so I would say its a pretty good bet that once that building goes live, single family houses nearby will be served pretty soon thereafter.

http://www.tonetoatl.com/2016/03/first-google-fiber-space-now-open-in.html (http://www.tonetoatl.com/2016/03/first-google-fiber-space-now-open-in.html)

They almost make it sound like it's up and running.  Not funny.
Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: vigodas-pants on March 31, 2016, 12:08 pm
They are setting up apartment complexes and condo building first, and then rolling it out from there, which makes sense.  According to the Google Fiber website, the new apartment building on Metropolitan that replaced the Gordon School is on the list of buildings that is scheduled to get Google Fiber service, so I would say its a pretty good bet that once that building goes live, single family houses nearby will be served pretty soon thereafter.

http://www.tonetoatl.com/2016/03/first-google-fiber-space-now-open-in.html (http://www.tonetoatl.com/2016/03/first-google-fiber-space-now-open-in.html)

They almost make it sound like it's up and running.  Not funny.

Thanks for the info.!
Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: Nate (NFN) on April 01, 2016, 11:01 am
Talked to the folks at Paces yesterday. The apartment should be starting tours and signing people up this week or next. They came in about 3-4 months early on the project. Google fiber must have sped them up (because it's fast).
Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: J. Grouchy on April 12, 2016, 02:14 pm

Where are the Google Fiber huts in Atlanta? (http://www.bizjournals.com/atlanta/news/2016/04/12/where-are-the-google-fiber-huts-in-atlanta.html)


Quote
BuildZoom reported the construction cost of a Google Fiber “hut” ranges from about $100,000 to $475,000. Additionally, the 12x30 foot huts, surrounded by chain-link fencing for security, typically house a 200 amp triple phase electric supply, an emergency stand-by natural gas generator, a power meter board and four in-ground vaults.
Here’s where they are:
▪1111 Hill St SE, Atlanta, GA 30315
▪1338 Evelyn St Ne, Atlanta, GA 30306
▪145 Macon Ter SE, Atlanta, GA 30315
▪165 Stafford St Nw, Atlanta, GA 30314
▪229 Holtzclaw St SE, Atlanta, GA 30316
▪2405 Fairburn Rd Sw, Atlanta , GA 30331
▪2531Cascade Rd Sw, Atlanta, GA 30311
▪3201 Roswell Rd Ne, Atlanta, GA 30305
▪675 Ponce De Leon Ave Ne, Atlanta, GA 30308
▪2309 Bankhead Hwy Nw, Atlanta, GA 30318
▪2440 Powers Ferry Rd Nw, Atlanta, GA 30342


Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: vigodas-pants on April 12, 2016, 09:59 pm

Where are the Google Fiber huts in Atlanta? (http://www.bizjournals.com/atlanta/news/2016/04/12/where-are-the-google-fiber-huts-in-atlanta.html)


Quote
BuildZoom reported the construction cost of a Google Fiber “hut” ranges from about $100,000 to $475,000. Additionally, the 12x30 foot huts, surrounded by chain-link fencing for security, typically house a 200 amp triple phase electric supply, an emergency stand-by natural gas generator, a power meter board and four in-ground vaults.
Here’s where they are:
▪1111 Hill St SE, Atlanta, GA 30315
▪1338 Evelyn St Ne, Atlanta, GA 30306
▪145 Macon Ter SE, Atlanta, GA 30315
▪165 Stafford St Nw, Atlanta, GA 30314
▪229 Holtzclaw St SE, Atlanta, GA 30316
▪2405 Fairburn Rd Sw, Atlanta , GA 30331
▪2531Cascade Rd Sw, Atlanta, GA 30311
▪3201 Roswell Rd Ne, Atlanta, GA 30305
▪675 Ponce De Leon Ave Ne, Atlanta, GA 30308
▪2309 Bankhead Hwy Nw, Atlanta, GA 30318
▪2440 Powers Ferry Rd Nw, Atlanta, GA 30342

Funny.  I drove by that spot on Holtzclaw a couple days ago and was wondering what was going on with it.
Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: katherine77 on May 23, 2016, 04:00 pm
Google reports that Fiber "is coming" to the new Alexan complex and Broadway East Atlanta. Hopefully that's good news for the rest of us too.

https://fiber.google.com/cities/atlanta/apartments/neighborhoods/?neighborhood=Atlanta
Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: JBB on August 01, 2016, 03:33 pm
Somebody (don't know who) is pulling fiber optic cables on Boulevard in Grant Park lately.
Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: vigodas-pants on August 01, 2016, 03:59 pm
Somebody (don't know who) is pulling fiber optic cables on Boulevard in Grant Park lately.

Putting or pulling?
Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: JBB on August 02, 2016, 09:53 am
Somebody (don't know who) is pulling fiber optic cables on Boulevard in Grant Park lately.

Putting or pulling?
In my limited experience, the installer "pulls" the cable off of the spool and through the conduit.

Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: Nate (NFN) on August 03, 2016, 11:50 pm
Somebody (don't know who) is pulling fiber optic cables on Boulevard in Grant Park lately.

Putting or pulling?
In my limited experience, the installer "pulls" the cable off of the spool and through the conduit.

You pull cable. True.
Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: J. Grouchy on August 04, 2016, 08:31 am
Putting, pulling...who the hell cares?  Just freaking give me my damn fiber already!
Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: Nate (NFN) on August 06, 2016, 09:05 pm
Putting, pulling...who the hell cares?  Just freaking give me my damn fiber already!


(http://konfrazzzled.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/03/Fiber.jpg)
Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: J. Grouchy on August 09, 2016, 11:11 am
Sign-ups are starting...
https://fiber.google.com/cities/atlanta/ (https://fiber.google.com/cities/atlanta/)

Not in our area yet, though...so don't get too excited.

(http://i.imgur.com/HpfJsuW.png)
Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: Bagel Snob on August 09, 2016, 01:28 pm
Sign-ups are starting...
https://fiber.google.com/cities/atlanta/ (https://fiber.google.com/cities/atlanta/)

Not in our area yet, though...so don't get too excited.

(http://i.imgur.com/HpfJsuW.png)

Come on google, take my goddamn money already.
Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: denise on August 09, 2016, 06:44 pm
Sounds like the end of the year or next Spring? We have been waiting. I wish they come here!
Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: J. Grouchy on September 02, 2016, 04:53 pm
AT&T has thrown down the gauntlet to Google Fiber on rolling-out high-speed fiber networks to the US. (http://www.zdnet.com/article/at-t-to-google-fiber-suck-it-up-broadband-is-tough-and-get-ready-to-eat-our-dust/)

Quote
A post on AT&T's public policy blog, entitled Broadband Investment: Not for the Faint of Heart, offers an account of Google's networking ambitions since 2007 -- predating the 2010 launch of Google Fiber -- and its failures ever since to deliver them.

According to the post's author, AT&T's VP of federal regulatory Joan Marsh, that's because Google underestimated the challenges of rolling-out fiber and overestimated the promise of alternative wireless technologies.

It follows a report that Google Fiber will halve its headcount and refocus on wireless broadband after failing to secure the five million subscribers it hoped to have attracted within five years.

Quote
"Instead of playing by the same rules as everyone else building infrastructure, Google Fiber demands special treatment and indeed in some places is getting it, unfairly," she wrote.

"Yet, Google Fiber still complains it's too hard... and costs too much... and takes too long... even as it's reported that Google Fiber will now try to do all this with half its current workforce," Marsh continued.

"Welcome to the broadband network business, Google Fiber. We'll be watching your next move from our rear view mirror. Oh, and pardon our dust."

 ***

Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: T@Nk on September 07, 2016, 12:51 pm
Quote
We'll be watching your next move from our rear view mirror. Oh, and pardon our dust.

 :handjob:

The dust accumulates around their slow ass internet connections...
Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: J. Grouchy on September 07, 2016, 01:09 pm
Quote
We'll be watching your next move from our rear view mirror. Oh, and pardon our dust.

 :handjob:

The dust accumulates around their slow ass internet connections...

I did notice they forgot to mention anything about the fact that they wouldn't be improving their own services if not for the threat of Google Fiber.  They - and Comcast - would still be dragging their proverbial feet, offering up 50mbps speeds because nobody else is challenging them.
Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: mongo on October 26, 2016, 09:54 am
I hope this does not mean Google will not be fully building out their fiber network in Atlanta.

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/10/26/technology/google-curbs-expansion-of-fiber-optic-network-cutting-jobs.html?_r=0 (http://www.nytimes.com/2016/10/26/technology/google-curbs-expansion-of-fiber-optic-network-cutting-jobs.html?_r=0)
Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: lore on October 26, 2016, 12:18 pm
I hope this does not mean Google will not be fully building out their fiber network in Atlanta.

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/10/26/technology/google-curbs-expansion-of-fiber-optic-network-cutting-jobs.html?_r=0 (http://www.nytimes.com/2016/10/26/technology/google-curbs-expansion-of-fiber-optic-network-cutting-jobs.html?_r=0)

doesn't sound like it, seems like they're just looking into other ways of providing the service?
but this:
"Because Google runs most of its business on the internet, analysts have suggested that its entry into the costly world of fiber optic internet was an attempt to motivate existing internet providers to accelerate the introduction of faster web connections."

Goal or not, that has worked pretty well. Forced AT&T to up my 'data cap' to 650 from 250. yay competition!
Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: vigodas-pants on October 26, 2016, 12:20 pm
I hope this does not mean Google will not be fully building out their fiber network in Atlanta.

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/10/26/technology/google-curbs-expansion-of-fiber-optic-network-cutting-jobs.html?_r=0 (http://www.nytimes.com/2016/10/26/technology/google-curbs-expansion-of-fiber-optic-network-cutting-jobs.html?_r=0)

doesn't sound like it, seems like they're just looking into other ways of providing the service?
but this:
"Because Google runs most of its business on the internet, analysts have suggested that its entry into the costly world of fiber optic internet was an attempt to motivate existing internet providers to accelerate the introduction of faster web connections."

Goal or not, that has worked pretty well. Forced AT&T to up my 'data cap' to 650 from 250. yay competition!

It seems like regardless of whether they continue going the fiber route, they are still interested in expanding availability of high speed internet service, just possibly leveraging more cost effective technology to do so.
Title: Re: Google Fiber...finally coming to ATL?
Post by: angryuser on October 28, 2016, 10:45 am
This is a pretty thoughtful article from Ars Technica on the topic.

Op-ed: Salvaging Google Fiber’s achievements
Google Fiber hasn't changed the world—yet.

Benoît Felten - 10/28/2016, 7:30 AM

http://arstechnica.com/business/2016/10/op-ed-salvaging-google-fibers-achievements/ (http://arstechnica.com/business/2016/10/op-ed-salvaging-google-fibers-achievements/)