Author Topic: Making extracts  (Read 1724 times)

Offline Beer Snob

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Making extracts
« on: July 07, 2014, 12:02 am »
My mints are doing very well this year and want to harvest them to make an ocean of extracts.
Anyone ever do this before?
I have already made some really good mint flavored simple syrup for mojito's

Basically what I am finding is a cup of so of mint along with a pint of vodka in a cool dark place for a few weeks gets ya what you need.
But I found some conflicting info-store in a warm dark place vs a cool dark place, 2 weeks vs 2 months, freeze strained extract and skim oil to use later.
And some horror stories of the whole thing goin bad.

Thoughts, experiences and recipes would be great.
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Offline barbecuesteve

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Re: Making extracts
« Reply #1 on: July 07, 2014, 03:51 am »
I would think a cool dark place to be best. With a starting alcohol percentage of around 40%, I would expect you to not have trouble with spoilage. Might have to strain it several times, first through a sieve, then through a coffee filter.
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Offline Dachshund Lady

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Re: Making extracts
« Reply #2 on: July 07, 2014, 01:05 pm »
Hubs made an excellent Creme de Menthe with fresh mint this year.  I don't even like CdeM, but it was delicious.  I'll ask him to post his experience.

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Offline bbmc

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Re: Making extracts
« Reply #3 on: July 07, 2014, 01:30 pm »
I do it every year with Lemons (for limoncello) and haven't had any horror stories. Just keep it high proof vodka in a reaaaallly clean container (I even go as far as sanitizing with a little bit of household bleach and a lot of warm water).   I usually let them sit in a closet for a month or so.
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Offline craig

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Re: Making extracts
« Reply #4 on: July 07, 2014, 02:21 pm »
Not an expert, but my procedure for crème de menthe was to take an equal volume of 40% ABV vodka and lightly packed, torn mint leaves, and infuse 24 hours at room temp.  I've read that mint can impart a bitter flavor if it's infused for a long time--but perhaps this hasn't been your experience?  Anyway, strain the vodka twice to get the plant bits out, then sugar equal to half the volume of vodka, and half as much water as that, into a pan, heat and stir until it's all dissolved, mix together and add a couple drops of green food coloring if that's your thing.

Or if you're not into ratios:
3 cp. vodka (roughly one 750 ml bottle)
3 cp. torn mint leaves, lightly packed
1 1/2 cp. white sugar
3/4 cp. water

Doesn't sound like this is quite what you're after, but it does make a nice drink.

Offline Flower Lady

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Re: Making extracts
« Reply #5 on: July 07, 2014, 10:15 pm »
I am well versed at making infused booze! I love to do it (and vinegars and other things).

Cucumber and a really smooth vodka like Chopan is really great. Steep the peeled cukes for 4-5 days for maximum flavor.
Oranges in tequila for a few days. YUMMY! (so is any citrus in Tequila, which I hate without flavorings).

A few coffee beans in any vodka is always appreciated during hot chocolate season, steep for a week, and remove beans. Give your self a shot when you need a pick me up! I also use this when I make frozen coffee beverages at home.

I store all of mine in the pantry, which is room temperature. Darkness is more important than temperature for both alcohol and vinegars. Both extract plant oils, and will do so in heat or in cool. Steep for a week. It shouldn't take any longer than that, mint is full of volatile oils so it will impart flavor very quickly.

If you like a licorice flavor I should think that Mexican Mint Marigold (or Southern Tarragon) would be really really nice done this way. It's naturally sweet and has a lovely flavor.
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Offline MRice

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Re: Making extracts
« Reply #6 on: July 07, 2014, 10:36 pm »
Beer Snob, I have pineapple mint and lemon balm if you want to experiment. I also have various other herbs.
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Offline Dachshund Lady

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Re: Making extracts
« Reply #7 on: July 08, 2014, 08:07 am »
I am well versed at making infused booze! I love to do it (and vinegars and other things).

Cucumber and a really smooth vodka like Chopan is really great. Steep the peeled cukes for 4-5 days for maximum flavor.
Oranges in tequila for a few days. YUMMY! (so is any citrus in Tequila, which I hate without flavorings).

A few coffee beans in any vodka is always appreciated during hot chocolate season, steep for a week, and remove beans. Give your self a shot when you need a pick me up! I also use this when I make frozen coffee beverages at home.

I store all of mine in the pantry, which is room temperature. Darkness is more important than temperature for both alcohol and vinegars. Both extract plant oils, and will do so in heat or in cool. Steep for a week. It shouldn't take any longer than that, mint is full of volatile oils so it will impart flavor very quickly.

If you like a licorice flavor I should think that Mexican Mint Marigold (or Southern Tarragon) would be really really nice done this way. It's naturally sweet and has a lovely flavor.

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Offline Flower Lady

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Re: Making extracts
« Reply #8 on: July 08, 2014, 05:33 pm »
Beer Snob, I have pineapple mint and lemon balm if you want to experiment. I also have various other herbs.

Lemon balm may turn the liquor it's in black.  Goth Booze...

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Offline irises62

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Re: Making extracts
« Reply #9 on: July 09, 2014, 05:55 am »
I am well versed at making infused booze! I love to do it (and vinegars and other things).

Cucumber and a really smooth vodka like Chopan is really great. Steep the peeled cukes for 4-5 days for maximum flavor.
Oranges in tequila for a few days. YUMMY! (so is any citrus in Tequila, which I hate without flavorings).

A few coffee beans in any vodka is always appreciated during hot chocolate season, steep for a week, and remove beans. Give your self a shot when you need a pick me up! I also use this when I make frozen coffee beverages at home.

I store all of mine in the pantry, which is room temperature. Darkness is more important than temperature for both alcohol and vinegars. Both extract plant oils, and will do so in heat or in cool. Steep for a week. It shouldn't take any longer than that, mint is full of volatile oils so it will impart flavor very quickly.

If you like a licorice flavor I should think that Mexican Mint Marigold (or Southern Tarragon) would be really really nice done this way. It's naturally sweet and has a lovely flavor.

#Busilytakesnotes

+1.