Author Topic: Implications of previous owner's (an investor) unpermitted renovation  (Read 459 times)

Offline jcarp

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We're under contract on an investor-renovated house right now and I recently looked up the permits on the Accela Atlanta site.

The only thing listed is a "Stop Work Case" resulting from "Working without a Permit". There was an extension approved, but no resolution on the stop work case. The initial inspection lists: "General repair, plumbing, electrical, drywall, hardwood floor installation, light partition framing. Stop work and notice posted." That pretty much described all of the renovation work that appears to have been completed at the house. There are no other permits or events found in the system when I search the property address. I have a few questions:

-What is the deal with an unresolved Stop Work Case from over a year ago? (the house was 90% renovated and has been sitting unfinished on the market for over a year now).

-What are the implications for me down the road if, in fact, the renovation work was never permitted?

Thanks for any help!
Jake

Offline Eurotrash

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Re: Implications of previous owner's (an investor) unpermitted renovation
« Reply #1 on: February 22, 2017, 10:26 pm »
Was the house foreclosed? 

We purchased a foreclosure that had an incomplete addition and went through the entire process of getting new permits and finishing everything off. 

In your case however I would call the city and try and get more info so you don't have to reopen walls for electrical or plumbing inspections.

Offline jcarp

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Re: Implications of previous owner's (an investor) unpermitted renovation
« Reply #2 on: February 24, 2017, 07:56 am »
Was the house foreclosed? 

Not foreclosed, just investor-owned.

I called the city and got some more information. Unpermitted work alone is not so much of a liability, per se, because CoA has no way of knowing that the work was done.

Unpermitted work that had a Stop Work Order issued is a problem for a new owner though. The city knows that the work was done (at least to a certain point) and the problem must be resolved through permitting of the items listed on the Stop Work Order. Even a new owner would be liable to permit the old unpermitted work if/when they applied to permit any other work taking place at the home.